Malone: a woman in a hurry

eksxhitmg

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Malone: a woman in a hurryOn 1 Apr 2002 in Personnel Today Beverly Malone, RCN general secretary, is committed to getting nurses’ feetunder the table at every level of the decision-making process.  Nurses should no longer just make thedecision handed down to them, they deserve a centre-stage position, by NicPaton It would have taken someone of exceptional prescience to predict that thefailure of Al Gore to win the presidency of the US back in November 2000 wouldhave a profound impact on UK nurses. But his loss to George W Bush has beenBritain’s gain because it brought Dr Beverly Malone, current general secretaryof the Royal College of Nurses, across the Atlantic. At the time of the election, Malone was President Bill Clinton’s deputyassistant health secretary – the highest position a nurse has held in the USgovernment – but the continuation of her role depended on a Gore win. That’swhy, in June last year, she found herself taking over the reins of the RCN fromChristine Hancock, when the latter moved on to become president of the InternationalCouncil of Nurses. Impressive credentials With two terms as president of the American Nurses Association under herbelt, a seat on Clinton’s Advisory Commission on Consumer Protection andQuality in the Health Care Industry and two listings in Ebony Magazine’s listof the 100 most influential African-Americans, in 1996 and 1998, there is noquestion that Malone is a big hitter. Yet she has come from humble beginnings. Raised in Elizabethtown, Kentucky,she grew up in a southern area of the US that was still racially segregated,before, following integration, making it to the University of Cincinnati in1970 where she studied for a Bachelor’s degree in nursing. This was followed by stints as a psychiatric clinical nurse specialist aswell as studying for a doctorate in clinical psychology from the sameuniversity. She took on a number of further roles with the university, such assetting up a department of clinical nurse specialists and nurse clinicians toprovide in-house and external consultancy. She also established a midwiferynurses programme and started her own private practice in personal therapy andprofessional consultation. In 1986 she moved to become dean of the School of Nursing at North CarolinaAgricultural and Technical State University, during which time she served onvarious public bodies. By 1996 she had made it to the ANA, a body thatrepresents180,000 nurses across the US. The call from Clinton came four yearslater. Firm believer in the NHS Now, sitting in the RCN’s Cavendish Square headquarters in London, Malonecomes across as warm but polished, very sharp and absolutely committed tobattling hard to get nurses a voice at the top tables of the NHS – a healthstructure she evidently admires deeply. “Back in the States the history has been that you fight and grab andscratch for every penny that you can on an individual basis. But I consider theNHS to be the system to have. I believe wholeheartedly in the principle thatcare needs to be free at the point of delivery and that it should beuniversally accessible to everyone. “I am delighted to be able to wake up in a country where this issue isnot the one I have to go out and fight a war about every day, as I had to inthe US – about the underlying, philosophical basis of the system ofcaring,” she says. The RCN has long been a trade union associated with radical demands on payand conditions and a tough, battle-hardened approach to dealing withgovernments. While more than prepared to fight these battles, Malone, assomeone with the clear view of an outsider, is adamant about the need to thinkbeyond the next day’s tussle. “I really believe that if we can get nurses into decision-making places– and I’m talking leadership here – at the table where decisions are made. Thenthere would be less need to be out there scrounging around about pay or otherissues. “Nurses would be shaping the system. That is what I am looking for, notfor us to do things in isolated splendour at the top of a hierarchy. I want tobe around the table with colleagues and I want nurses’ input to be there,”she argues. “I am so discouraged when I see us only taking decisions thatare handed down to us and responding to those in a very reactive way, not ableto shape what it could be like for our patients,” she adds. Greater power for nurses Both the Government and doctors seem, finally, to be heeding her call.Health Secretary Alan Milburn has long recognised the need to give nursesgreater power and autonomy. In February, for instance, he unveiled a raft of new prescribing powers fornurses while Prime Minister Tony Blair pledged greater flexibility in workingpractices for frontline staff and a “highly charged debate” about howhealthcare should be funded. Malone says she believes “wholeheartedly” that the Government islistening to nurses and the medical profession, not least because there is nowso much at stake politically. Perhaps more surprisingly, the BMA in adiscussion document the same month said it might be prepared to abandon thehallowed role of GPs as “gatekeepers” to the NHS in favour of a morenurse-focused approach. It proposed nurses could co-ordinate the care around a patient, so that inprimary care, for instance, nurse practitioners would be the first port of callwith doctors only being called upon when their skills are needed. BMA chairmanDr Ian Bogle even conceded that those working in the NHS needed “to take along, hard look at how they work”. Shortage of nurses This, of course, is all well and good in principle, but if the nurses arenot there to do the job – and 25 per cent of nurses are now aged over 50 – itis simply not going to work. The shortage of nurses, and the need to stop theexodus from the profession is already one of the biggest issues policymakersneed to address, Malone asserts. “How do you convince nurses who feel undervalued that they should stayin the profession maybe another five to 10 years?” she asks. “I think you have to find new ways of working. I really believe thatthere should be newly developed opportunities for nurses who are older so theydo not have to do the same type of work that they did when they were 21, 28 or30.” The age of nursing students is getting older, with the average now 25 to 27rather than the 18-to-20-year-olds of a few years back, making issues of payand opportunities for career progression and lifelong continuing education evenmore critical. “The pay is the single most effective determinant of why nurses stay innursing,” she stresses. Despite all the extra money the Government isputting into the NHS, Malone says she is still “appalled” at how lownurses’ pay remains. “There has to be a big boost for nursing pay to get better. It’s notsomething that can be done in little increments – I have a saying ‘it’s a cinchby the inch but it’s hard by the yard’ – but when it comes to pay we need theyard,” she asserts. She is also horrified by how little thought appears to go into workforceplanning for nurses, something that she believes should be top of the agendawhen there is a recruitment and retention crisis . “I am hoping that the RCN will be able to work with the Government inputting something together that could actually start monitoring workforce andworkforce issues. Whether it’s why people are coming back into nursing or whythey don’t come back, those sorts of questions and research opportunities needto be available,” she says. Occupational health nurses Despite asking for Carol Bannister, the RCN’s OH adviser, to sit in on theinterview, it is obvious that, even with all her other areas of responsibility,Malone has made an effort to brief herself closely on some of the key areas ofconcern for occupational health nurses. “I believe occupational health nurses are some of the most requiredsystems thinkers there are,” she argues, arguing that they often need totake a holistic approach to decision-making. “They have to continually assess the environment and the community.They have to be thinking about how they can shape the response of theircorporation so that it is more accessible to the people who work there.” Not enough of this type of thinking takes place in the NHS, she adds, andoccupational health nurses could be used more to pass on best practice thinkingto, say, acute care nurses. “What can we do in the system to make sure our patients’ stay is asinfection-free and healthy as possible, for instance. How do we make sure thatit is not complicated by other things?” Ultimately, nurses need to stop thinking of themselves as people who simplycarry out the orders of the great and good and realise they have something ofvalue to contribute to the decision-making process, she argues. She cites theexample of some private finance initiative-built hospitals that have been constructedwith corridors too narrow to turn trolleys around, or where nurses cannot seepatients from their nursing station. Malone would like to see the new strategic health authorities being set up”clearly reflecting nursing input at every level” and primary caretrusts similarly putting nurses centre stage in the decision-making process. “I’m talking about making sure that nurses are involved indecision-making, shaping how care is delivered, how buildings are built and howsystems are managed. And it is not just for the glory of nursing, it is forpatient care and that’s why I feel we cannot be patient about this and use itas a long-term goal,” she says. “I think that we should do some knocking of heads together, in a verypolite and courteous but nevertheless very clear and dramatic way, to say thatif you are really talking about building a patient-centred environment, whetherit be in a workplace or a PCT or acute care trust, it has to be that thepatient is central. Because nurses are advocates for patients and deliver 80per cent of their care, they need to be involved in that decision-makingprocess. “It’s a wake-up call, but it’s a win for everyone. At times some peoplemay say ‘oh those nurses they just want more’ but it really is about changingthe system and making sure patients get what they need.” When Malone visits nurses around the country – which she does frequently –the most common complaint is the sense of being undervalued andunder-recognised, she says. There’s a disparity between the high perception inwhich nurses are held within the public eye and the attitudes of doctors,ministers and administrators to their nurse colleagues. “There’s a real gap between how the public views nurses and how we aretreated. There is nowhere that I go when I talk to nurses that this issue isnot raised,” she explains. For occupational health nurses this would mean being in a position wheretheir decisions are affecting the way their company operates, either becausethey are on the board or because they have access to it. “I would like to hear about some occupational health nurses who weresitting on the boards of their companies having a direct way of feeding backinformation about health and safety, how they save that organisation money, howthey get people back into employment and how they are planning and working todo that successfully. To me that would be a measure of success,” she says.With the political clock ticking loudly, Blair and Milburn are men in ahurry to see real improvements in the NHS. Equally, for Malone, getting nursesto the table where decisions are made is a vital part of this process. It needsto sit beside the battle for this percentage pay rise or that number of extranurses. “I believe it has to be short-term goal. I want to see, soon, nurses atthe decision-making table, with communities, regardless of who they are, havingan appreciation that nurses are the ones who are managing the system of care. Ithink we need to be very impatient about this,” she stresses. Comments are closed. last_img read more

Tullow Oil to sell Ugandan assets to Total for $575m

eksxhitmg

first_imgThe assets involved in the deal between Tullow Oil and Total are the Uganda Lake Albert development project and the East African Crude Oil Pipeline System Total agrees to buy the Ugandan assets of Tullow Oil. (Credit: Zbynek Burival/Unsplash) Tullow Oil has agreed to offload its Ugandan assets to Total for $575m, which includes the former’s stake in the Uganda Lake Albert project.As per the terms of the deal, the French oil and gas company will acquire Tullow Oil’s 33.33% stake in the Uganda Lake Albert development project, which covers the exploration licenses – EA1, EA1A, EA2 and EA3A.The company will also be acquiring Tullow Oil’s stake in the 1,445km long East African Crude Oil Pipeline System (EACOP project), being laid between Uganda and Tanzania with an investment of $3.5bn.Total will make an initial payment of $500m at the closing of the deal, and the remaining $75m when a final investment decision is taken on the Uganda Lake Albert development project. Additionally, Total will make conditional payments, which will be linked to production and oil price, triggered when Brent prices are more than $62/bbl.The onshore Lake Albert Development Project, which is located in the Lake Albert Rift Basin, is estimated to have over 1.5 billion barrels of discovered recoverable resources.The onshore oil project is anticipated to yield about 230,000 barrels of oil per day (bopd) at plateau.In August 2019, Tullow Oil, owing to a tax dispute with the Ugandan government, had to scrap its deal of selling its operated stake of 33.3% in the Lake Albert Development Project to co-venturers Total and CNOOC for about $910m.Total chairman and CEO Patrick Pouyanné said: “We are pleased to announce that a new agreement has been reached with Tullow to acquire their entire interests in the Lake Albert development project for less than 2$/bbl in line with our strategy of acquiring long-term resources at low cost, and that we have an agreement with the Uganda government on the fiscal framework.“This acquisition will enable us, together with our partner CNOOC, to now move the project forward toward FID, driving costs down to deliver a robust long-term project.”Tullow Oil to use proceeds from the sale to reduce its debtTullow Oil said that the sale of its Ugandan assets is part of its strategy to reduce its cost base and manage its portfolio to cut down net debt and consolidate its balance sheet.Tullow Oil executive chair Dorothy Thompson said: “This deal is important for Tullow and forms the first step of our programme of portfolio management. It represents an excellent start towards our previously announced target of raising in excess of US$1 billion to strengthen the balance sheet and secure a more conservative capital structure.“We have already made good progress with the Government of Uganda and the Uganda Revenue Authority in moving this Transaction forward, including by agreeing the principles on tax treatment, and we will work closely with the Government, Total and CNOOC over the coming months to reach completion as quickly as possible.”The closing of the deal is subject to the approval of Tullow Oil’s shareholders, customary regulatory and government approvals, and also on CNOOC exercising its pre-emption rights on 50% of the transaction.last_img read more

Sri Lanka Navy Arrests 112 Persons Illegally Bound for Australia

eksxhitmg

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Sri Lanka Navy Arrests 112 Persons Illegally Bound for Australia View post tag: Bound Sri Lanka Navy Arrests 112 Persons Illegally Bound for Australia View post tag: Sri View post tag: Illegally View post tag: Lanka View post tag: Arrests View post tag: Australia Share this article October 12, 2012 View post tag: Navy Sri Lanka Navy arrested 112 persons illegally bound for Australia in a multi-day trawler on 11th October 2012. The trawler named “St. Anthony-2” with 91 Tamils, 14 Sinhalese and 7 Muslims on board was intercepted by a Fast Naval Patrol Craft attached to the Western Naval Command off Chilaw seas.Among the arrested persons are 103 men, a woman and 8 children (boys). They are residents of Jaffna, Vavuniya, Killinochchi, Chilaw, Batticaloa, Puttlam, Trincomalee, Negombo, Mannar and Mullaithivu. All were brought to Mutwal Fishery Harbour to be handed over to the CID for further investigations.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, October 12, 2012; Image: Sri Lanka Navy Training & Education View post tag: 112 View post tag: Personslast_img read more

USCG offshore patrol cutters to feature Optimarin BWTS

eksxhitmg

first_imgEastern Shipbuilding Group (ESG) has selected Optimarin to supply ballast water treatment systems (BWTS) for nine offshore patrol cutters (OPC) to be built at its Panama City, FL shipyard.The agreement with ESG will see the Optimarin Ballast Systems (OBS) fitted in the new OPCs, designed to support the nation’s maritime security and undertake vital border protection duties.Equipped to carry helicopters, Over-the-Horizon (OTH) boats and featuring sophisticated combat systems, these vessels will begin replacing the coast guard’s existing fleet of medium endurance cutters in 2021.“The USCG is a flag-bearer in the fight against invasive species carried in ballast water and sets the bar for BWT regulations globally,” Tore Andersen, Optimarin CEO, said.In December 2016, Optimarin became the first BWT supplier to gain USCG Type Approval. The OBS utilizes a combination of filtration and UV lamps to treat ballast water without the need for chemicals. The systems are simple to operate, maintain and due to their modular design can be fitted in vessels where available space is at a premium, according to the BWT manufacturer. View post tag: USCG Photo: Photo: ESG Share this article View post tag: BWTS View post tag: Optimarin View post tag: offshore patrol cutters View post tag: OPC View post tag: ESGlast_img read more

MUST READ CORONAVIRUS UPDATES FROM WASHINGTON POST

eksxhitmg

first_imgThe country’s Health Ministry claims that about 10,000 have been infected and 429 have died. But mass graves — confirmed by videos, satellite images and other open-source data — could mean Iran has suffered more deaths than its government has let on. The virus lurks in the body even after people feel better. A new study in the Lancet, based on research in China, found that the median length of time the virus remains in the respiratory tract of a patient after symptoms begin is 20 days. Among patients who survived the disease, the virus continued to be shed for between eight and 37 days. With H1N1, also known as the swine flu, Fauci said there was less mass panic because unlike the new coronavirus, it was an influenza virus. The coronavirus can be shed by people even before they develop symptoms. That pre-symptomatic transmission has helped it become a stealth contagion. The coronavirus may take many days — up to 14 — before an infection flares into symptoms, and although most people recover without a serious illness, this is not a bug that comes and goes quickly. 7:21 a.m.This Is The Coronavirus Math That Has Experts So Worried 7:30 a.m.Coronavirus Can Be Transmitted Before Symptoms Arise, Scientists Find Munster and his colleagues have conducted experiments showing that at least some coronavirus can potentially remain viable — capable of infecting a person — for up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to three days on plastic and stainless steel. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Federal agencies are trying to get ahead of any problems as telework is being encouraged, though not mandated at this point. The Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency is working entirely remotely today to stress-test whether the agency will be up to the job “if CISA-wide telework becomes necessary in response to the outbreak,” spokeswoman Sara Sendek said. Fauci: U.S. health system ‘not really geared to what we need right now’ If U.S. adversaries, such as Russia or Iran, creep inside government computer networks, they could disrupt efforts to mitigate the virus by stopping or slowing down communications. They could also sow chaos by sending phony alerts about the virus to the government workforce or the public. “There have been an awful lot of challenges,” Fauci said, noting the HIV/AIDS crisis in the 1980s and the H1N1 influenza pandemic in 2009. “With regard to disruption of everyday life, we have not seen that before, but we’ve not had this kind of a situation before.” Sign up for our Coronavirus Updates newsletter to track the outbreak. All stories linked within the newsletter are free to access. For weeks now, America’s leaders and its public have been obsessed with one set of numbers: How many people have died? How many confirmed cases? And in what states? As coronavirus infections mount, the federal government is preparing for an unprecedented experiment in remote working that brings with it a slew of digital dangers. Inside the race to find a coronavirus vaccine and treatment A stark contrast in the coronavirus mortality rates in South Korea and Iran shows how critical a government’s response can be in determining whether the disease is stymied or spread. Public health experts say they want to ensure the U.S. outcome turns out more like the former. Scientists studying the novel coronavirus are quickly uncovering features that allow it to infect and sicken human beings. Consider the ventilators. For those severely ill with a respiratory disease like Covid-19, ventilators are a matter of life and death because they allow patients to breathe when they cannot on their own. In a report, last month, the Center for Health Security at Johns Hopkins estimated American has a total of 160,000 ventilators available for patient care. Read more here. During an interview on “CBS This Morning,” Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the widespread disruption to everyday American life from the coronavirus is unlike anything the nation has experienced in his 36 years on the job. 8:16 a.m.Analysis: Why South Korea, Not Iran, Is A Model For U.S. Coronavirus Response South Korea managed to dramatically arrest the spread. It’s conducting more tests per person than any other country in the world, with about 15,000 people getting tested every day. The government has set up dozens of drive-through testing centers. South Korean officials aggressively informed the public about how to respond, including with cellphone alerts notifying people of new cases near them. By Paige Winfield Cunningham 7:32 a.m.Fauci Says Coronavirus Disruption Is Unlike Anything He Has Experienced In 36 Years On Job By Joel Achenbach This coronavirus can establish itself in the upper respiratory tract, said Vincent Munster, chief of the Virus Ecology Section of Rocky Mountain Laboratories, a facility in Hamilton, Mont., that is part of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. That enables the virus to spread more easily through coughing and sneezing, and stands in contrast to another coronavirus that Munster’s laboratory has studied — MERS, which tends to infect cells in the lower respiratory tract, he said. Read more here. Sign up for our Coronavirus Updates newsletter to track the outbreak. All stories linked within the newsletter are free to access. As neighboring countries canceled flights and alerted medical personnel, Iranian officials said little in public about the virus. They didn’t announce the disease’s arrival in the country until Feb. 19, when officials said two people had already died. By Joseph Marks But the government has never attempted to work remotely on anywhere near this scale before. At DHS alone, as many as 240,000 workers could be asked to work remotely; the CISA test alone involves 3,500 people. “Will we take the tough actions to mitigate spread, or will we let this spread like the flu?” said Scott Gottlieb, former head of the Food and Drug Administration. “I think we will end up somewhere in between: not helpless like Iran, but not as aggressive and swift as South Korea.” 7:24 a.m.Federal Government Could Soon Send Employees Home To Work. That Poses Serious Cyber Dangers. Read more here. “We were familiar with what influenza does. We were familiar with its seasonal capability,” Fauci said. “Right now there are a lot of unknowns and I think that’s the thing that’s frightening people.” By Katie Mettler But to understand why experts are so alarmed and what may be coming next, the public needs to start paying attention to a whole other set of numbers: How many ventilators do we have in this country? How many hospital beds? How many doctors and nurses? And most importantly, how many sick people can they all treat at the same time? The Trump administration is ordering hundreds of thousands of federal employees to be prepared to telework full time if the virus spread worsens, as my colleague Lisa Rein reports. And it’s far from clear government technologists are prepared to handle that strain. A planning study run by the federal government in 2005 estimated that if America were struck with a moderate pandemic like the 1957 influenza, the country would need more than 64,000 ventilators. If we were struck with a severe pandemic like the 1918 Spanish flu, we would need more than 740,000 ventilators — many times more than are available.The math on hospitals isn’t any better. The United States has roughly 2.8 hospital beds per 1,000 people.South Korea, which has seen success mitigating its large outbreak, has more than 12 hospital beds per 1,000 people. China, where hospitals in Hubei were quickly overrun, has 4.3 beds per 1,000. Italy, a developed country with a reasonably decent health system, has seen its hospitals overwhelmed and has 3.2 beds per 1,000. During a CNN town hall program on the coronavirus Thursday night, Anthony Fauci, the longtime director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, addressed whether it is safe to open a package delivered by mail: “I think if you start thinking about money and mail and things like that, you can almost sort of immobilize yourself, which I don’t think is a good idea.” The country has reported 7,800 cases, but just 66 deaths — a relatively low mortality rate under 1 percent. Its daily growth in new cases also appears to be slowing. But it’s a different story in Iran, a country with 80 million people where cases are surging and several top officials — including two dozen members of parliament and a vice president — have been infected. By William Wan, Ariana Eunjung Cha and Lena Sunlast_img read more

Ocean City Boy Scout Troop 32 Holds Clothing Drive

eksxhitmg

first_imgA clothing drive for Boy Scout Troop 32 will help members purchase camping gear and other supplies. (Photo provided by Doug Otto) Submitted by Doug OttoOcean City Boy Scout Troop 32 will host a clothing drive on Saturday May 25, between 8 a.m. and noon at Island Auto Repair 713 Haven Ave. in Ocean City.Proceeds will be used to acquire troop supplies, including tents and camping gear.Those who would like to participate are invited to donate new or gently used clothes, shoes, linens, purses, hats and stuffed animals.For further information, contact Beth Schumacher by phone (609) 399-1201 or visit the Ocean City Troop 32 website at www.octroop32.com.“This is an opportunity for Ocean City residents to clean out their closets prior to the holidays, while donating to a worthy community youth activity,” said Scoutmaster Dean Mitzel.Ocean City Boy Scout Troop 32 was chartered in 1964 by Ferguson-Foglio VFW Post 6650.The troop offers a year-round adventure-based program designed to encourage effective character, citizenship, and fitness training for boys age 11-18.Boy Scout meetings are held Tuesday at 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church at 701 Wesley Ave. in Ocean City.last_img read more

6 named Schwarzman fellows

eksxhitmg

first_imgSix Harvard students have been selected to attend Tsinghua University in Beijing as part of the inaugural class of Schwarzman Scholars. The new, one-year master’s degree program is designed to assist future leaders who are now pursuing public policy, economics and business, or international studies and who wish to tackle the many challenges facing China’s rapidly changing political, economic, and social landscape and ultimately build greater understanding and closer relationships between 21st-century China and the world.Christian Føhrby, 25, received an A.B. in government from Harvard College in 2014 and an M.S. in global politics from the London School of Economics and Political Science. A native of Denmark, Føhrby was very active in Harvard’s music and theater communities as a performer, writer, and director, and believes art can help build the civic awareness and cooperation needed to better U.S.-Chinese relations.A Harvard College senior, Jonathan Jeffrey, 21, is studying history with an emphasis on U.S. foreign policy that he hopes will help prepare him for a career as a diplomat. Jeffrey helped draft the College’s first honor code, serves on the Honor Council, and is a research assistant to former ambassador R. Nicholas Burns, who directs the Future of Diplomacy Project at Harvard Kennedy School.Now studying sociology and economics at the College, Rugsit Kanan, 22, is president of the Harvard Association for U.S.-China Relations, which promotes dialogue between young leaders from both nations. He also plays chess for Thailand’s national team and enjoys writing poetry in Thai, Mandarin, and English. After working in financial services, ultimately Kanan would like to help Thai businesses and scholars connect with opportunities in the United States and China.Bonnie Lei, 23, is a 2015 College graduate who studied organismic and evolutionary biology. As a student, she discovered a new sea slug species in the Caribbean, worked on penguin conservation efforts in South Africa and developed new ideas for sustainable agriculture education in Uganda. Lei intends to further her interest in public policy and leadership with an eye toward becoming a leader in interdisciplinary conservation efforts for NGOs and local communities.Rahim Mawji, 23, graduated from Harvard College in 2015 with an applied mathematics concentration and a secondary concentration in sociology. While here, Mawji, who is from Kenya and Tanzania, served as president of the African Students Association, taught in China, worked with an energy developer in Ghana, did research in South Africa and studied with mystics in Indonesia. He hopes to forge stronger economic and educational ties between Africa and both the Eastern and Western worlds.J.R. Thornton, 24, graduated from the College in 2014. He was an internationally ranked junior tennis player who played both on the Harvard team and professionally. From the United Kingdom, Thornton spent time in Beijing as a teenager, which inspired his first novel, “Beautiful Country,” a best-seller in China that will be published worldwide by Harper Collins later this year. He intends to enter public service, where he will work toward improving China’s relationship with the United States.last_img read more

Lizabeth Cohen wins Bancroft Prize

eksxhitmg

first_img Cohen to step down as Radcliffe Institute dean Cohen, who devoted nights, weekends, semester breaks, and vacations while Radcliffe dean to writing the new book, said she is thrilled by her second Bancroft win — especially because it means the book’s message “may now get further notice, as it challenges much received wisdom about the impact of the federal government’s involvement in revitalizing cities in the post-World War II period.”“Although I don’t in any way whitewash the mistakes made in the heyday of urban renewal, I try to show that strategies evolved over time and that there were some progressive goals and achievements, such as a commitment on the part of someone like Ed Logue to creating mixed-income and mixed-race communities and to subsidizing the construction of affordable housing,” Cohen said. “As we face the current COVID-19 pandemic, I think it is more important than ever that Americans recognize that there are some things that government, particularly at the federal level, must do, and that it is not sufficient to leave the solution of major social problems only to the private sector.” Urban planning and social justice Examining the life and career of Ed Logue, who helped reinvent postwar American cities Lizabeth Cohen has done it again. For the second time, the Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies and former dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study has won the Bancroft Prize in American history and diplomacy. The 2020 honor is for her book “Saving America’s Cities: Ed Logue and the Struggle to Renew Urban America in the Suburban Age.”Cohen’s  work, published in October by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, probes the life of Yale-educated lawyer Ed Logue, whose career as a city planner helped reshape and revive a number of declining American cities, including Boston, New Haven, and New York, in the decades after World War II.“With this project I set out not just to examine somebody with power in city building, but to bring the categories of analysis that mattered to social history — class, race, occupation, gender — to understanding a person who had great influence,” Cohen told the Gazette in an interview last year. “As we face the current COVID-19 pandemic, I think it is more important than ever that Americans recognize that there are some things that government … must do.” — Liz Cohen ‘Will progressives and moderates feud while America burns?’center_img Related Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne outlines a path forward in his new book ‘Code Red’ After seven years, she’ll return to teaching and research in history after a sabbatical year Bancroft winners are judged by the “scope, significance, depth of research, and richness of interpretation they present in the areas of American history and diplomacy,” according to a statement by Columbia University, which administers the prize. Cohen’s book, honored along with “Illusions of Emancipation: The Pursuit of Freedom and Equality in the Twilight of Slavery,” by Joseph P. Reidy, was chosen from 200 submitted for consideration.“Cohen provides a nuanced view of federally funded urban redevelopment and of one of its major practitioners that goes beyond the simplicity of good and bad, heroes and villains,” the Columbia statement read.Cohen’s book “Making a New Deal: Industrial Workers in Chicago, 1919‒1939” won the Bancroft Prize in 1991, and was finalist for a Pulitzer Prize.last_img read more

Alumni committee nominates candidates for Overseers, HAA elected directors

eksxhitmg

first_imgOnce again this spring, Harvard degree holders will have the opportunity to vote for new members of the Harvard Board of Overseers and elected directors of the Harvard Alumni Association (HAA).The elections will begin April 1. Eligible voters will have the option of voting either online or by paper ballot. Completed ballots must be received by 5 p.m. (EDT) on May 18. All holders of Harvard degrees, except officers of instruction and government at Harvard and members of the Harvard Corporation, are entitled to vote for Overseer candidates. All Harvard degree holders may vote for HAA elected directors.The candidates listed below will be considered by voters for five anticipated vacancies on the Board of Overseers and for six openings among the HAA elected directors.The eight candidates for Overseer and the nine candidates for HAA elected director have emerged from this fall’s deliberations of the HAA nominating committee. The committee’s voting members include three current or recent Overseers as well as 10 Harvard alumni of varied backgrounds and experience who are appointed by the HAA executive committee. Through its deliberations, which extended over the fall, the nominating committee reviewed approximately 300 individuals proposed for inclusion on the Overseers ballot and approximately 200 individuals proposed for inclusion on the ballot for HAA elected directors.Candidates for Overseer may also be nominated by petition — by obtaining a required number of signatures from eligible voters. The deadline for all petitions is Feb. 3. Eligible voters may go to elections.harvard.edu/elections-process for more information.The Board of Overseers is one of Harvard’s two governing boards, along with the President and Fellows, also known as the Corporation. Formally established in 1642, the Board plays an integral role in the governance of the University. As a central part of its work, the Board directs the visitation process, the primary means for periodic external assessment of Harvard’s Schools and departments. Through its array of standing committees, and the roughly 50 visiting committees that report to them, the Board probes the quality of Harvard’s programs and assures that the University remains true to its charter as a place of learning. More generally, drawing on its members’ diverse experience and expertise, the Board provides counsel to the University’s leadership on priorities, plans, and strategic initiatives.  The Board also has the power of consent to certain actions such as the election of Corporation members.  The current membership of the board is listed here.The names of the candidates nominated by the nominating committee appear below (in alphabetical order).Overseer candidatesThe HAA nominating committee has proposed the following Overseer candidates for the 2021 election.Christiana Goh Bardon, M.D. ’98 magna cum laude, M.B.A. ’03S.B./S.M. ’93, Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyManaging Director, Oncology Impact Fund andFounder, Managing Member, Portfolio Manager, Burrage CapitalChestnut Hill, Mass.Mark J. Carney ’87 magna cum laudeM.Phil. ’93, D.Phil. ’95, University of OxfordUnited Nations Special Envoy for Climate Action and FinanceFormer Governor, Bank of England and Bank of CanadaOttawa, Ontario, CanadaKimberly Nicole Dowdell, M.P.A. ’15B.Arch. ’06, Cornell UniversityPrincipal and Director of Business Development, HOK Group, Inc.Immediate Past President, National Organization of Minority ArchitectsChicagoChristopher B. Howard, M.B.A. ’03 with distinctionB.S. ’91, United States Air Force Academy; M.Phil. ’94, D.Phil. ’96, University of OxfordPresident, Robert Morris UniversityPittsburghMaria Teresa Kumar, M.P.P. ’01B.A. ’96, University of California, DavisCEO/President, Voto LatinoWashington, D.C.Raymond J. Lohier Jr. ’88 cum laudeJ.D. ’91, New York University School of LawUnited States Circuit Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second CircuitBrooklyn, N.Y.Terah Evaleen Lyons ’14Founding Executive Director, Partnership on AISan FranciscoSheryl WuDunn, M.B.A. ’86B.A. ’81, Cornell University; M.P.A. ’88, Princeton UniversityJournalist and Author; Co-Founder, FullSky PartnersWestchester, N.Y.The HAA Board is an advisory board that guides the fostering of alumni community building, creating University citizens of alumni and alumni volunteers. The work focuses on developing volunteer leadership, increasing and deepening alumni engagement through an array of programs that support alumni communities worldwide. In recent years, the board’s priorities have included strengthening outreach to recent graduates and graduate school alumni; supporting antiracism work in alumni communities; and continuing to build and promote inclusive communities.Elected director candidatesThe HAA nominating committee has proposed the following HAA elected director candidates for the 2021 election.Whitney S.F. Baxter ’07, M.B.A. ’11Vice President, Head of Strategy and Group Enterprises, MTV Entertainment GroupBrooklyn, N.Y.Benjamin Taylor Faw, M.B.A. ’14B.S. ’07, United States Military AcademyCo-founder and CEO, AdVon CommerceLas VegasJane Labanowski ’17Lead, Spaceport Development, SpaceXBrownsville, TexasHannah Park ’13M.B.A. ’20, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern UniversityHuman Resources Business Partner, Curriculum AssociatesEverett, Mass.Tenzin Priyadarshi, M.T.S. ’03B.A./B.S. ’01, Le Moyne CollegeDirector, The Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values at MITCambridge, Mass.Rebecca Chamian Ribaudo ’93, magna cum laudeAuthor and Freelance WriterChicagoÍñigo Sánchez-Asiaín, M.B.A. ’90B.A. ’86, Universidad Pontificia ComillasFounding Partner, Portobello CapitalMadridGeorge Abraham Thampy ’10M.B.A. ’17, Stanford UniversitySenior Director, CareDxSan FranciscoMaiya Williams Verrone ’84, cum laudeTelevision Writer/Producer and AuthorPacific Palisades, Calif.last_img read more

Feds: Man threatened family of congressman, journalist

eksxhitmg

first_imgNEW YORK (AP) — Federal authorities say they’ve arrested a California man for threatening harm in text messages sent during the attack on the Capitol to family members of a New York congressman and a journalist. Robert Lemke was arrested in Bay Point, California, on Tuesday and will make an initial appearance in federal court in Northern California on Wednesday. A criminal complaint charging him with threatening interstate communications says he identifies himself on a Facebook page as a former captain in the U.S. Air Force and a retired sergeant with the Alameda County Sheriff’s Office in California. It was not immediately clear who will represent him in court.last_img