The Bee Equity Partners Ltd (FIDE.mu) Q12013 Interim Report

eksxhitmg

first_imgThe Bee Equity Partners Ltd (FIDE.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Investment sector has released it’s 2013 interim results for the first quarter.For more information about The Bee Equity Partners Ltd (FIDE.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the The Bee Equity Partners Ltd (FIDE.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: The Bee Equity Partners Ltd (FIDE.mu)  2013 interim results for the first quarter.Company ProfileThe Bee Equity Partners Limited (formerly Forward Investment and Development Enterprises Limited) operates as a private equity firm that is involved in small to medium enterprise investments. The company also offers financial solutions for entrepreneurs in Mauritius. The company’s segments include stone crushing, block making and investment activities. The Bee Equity Partners Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius.last_img read more

Clydestone (Ghana) Limited (CLYD.gh) Q32016 Interim Report

eksxhitmg

first_imgClydestone (Ghana) Limited (CLYD.gh) listed on the Ghana Stock Exchange under the Technology sector has released it’s 2016 interim results for the third quarter.For more information about Clydestone (Ghana) Limited (CLYD.gh) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Clydestone (Ghana) Limited (CLYD.gh) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Clydestone (Ghana) Limited (CLYD.gh)  2016 interim results for the third quarter.Company ProfileClydestone (Ghana) Limited is a global information and communications technology company with offices in Ghana, Nigeria and Kenya. The company uses cutting-edge innovations to provide information technology solutions for financial institutions involved in financial document processing, remittance processing and transaction switching. Its product range encompasses: G-Switch, an electronic payment platform; G-Secure, a card authentication programme; Remita, modular system for e-payments; UnionPay Processor; automated check clearing; ATM and cash processing; multi-vendor ATM software solutions and multi-factor authentication. Clydestone is a Principle Acquiring Member of UnionPay International and offers acquiring services to 19 banks in Africa and provides check truncation systems to 12 leading banks in Ghana. Clydestone (Ghana) Limited is listed on the Ghana Stock Exchangelast_img read more

How volunteers are making a difference for animal welfare

eksxhitmg

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your name here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom TAGSAnimal WelfarePets Previous articleThe edible backyard: A source for family meals – and funNext articleApopka Mail Carriers Make Special Delivery Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! When you come home from work, he’s always there to greet you. When you need extra motivation to workout, he’s happy to join for a walk. When you’ve had a bad day, he can sense it and is quick to give you a loving nuzzle. Pets provide endless joy to their families, but for millions of shelter animals, each day is a test of patience in hopes of finding a forever home.Approximately 7.6 million companion animals enter shelters nationwide every year, according to the American Society of Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) statistics. Of those, approximately 3.9 million are dogs and 3.4 million are cats. These numbers underscore the massive need for volunteers to provide the necessary care to ensure as many pets as possible can be placed in safe, loving homes.Volunteers are the lifeblood of any shelter, and it’s a true community effort to keep animals healthy and safe. The Dumb Friends League — Denver’s largest animal shelter dedicated to giving a voice to those who cannot speak for themselves — depended on 1,418 volunteers who donated 211,307 hours of service last fiscal year to help needy animals in Colorado. That’s the equivalent of 101 full-time employees worth $4.7 million in donated time.This is just one example of the impact volunteers make in the estimated 13,600 shelters nationwide.In addition to volunteers, support from a variety of businesses and corporations helps keep shelters running strong. Hill’s Pet Nutrition, for example, is one of the largest donors of food to shelters across the country. In fact, Hill’s Food, Shelter & Love(R) program has provided more than $280 million worth of food to more than 1,000 shelters since its inception in 2002.Both volunteers and Hill’s share the common goal of transforming the lives of homeless pets. To recognize the vital contribution of shelter volunteers, Hill’s has launched an initiative this year to bring volunteers long overdue recognition. Hill’s has created a contest, Hill’s Shelter Heroes, to recognize the amazing volunteers who continue to go above and beyond in their commitment to shelter pets.One of the recent winners, Annie Hughes with Wayside Waifs in Kansas City, who has dedicated more than 7,279 hours to her shelter, wanted to express her appreciation to Hill’s for creating a program that “allowed her to share her passion for helping sheltered animals.” Hughes’ submission, along with the rest of the 10 finalists, can be seen at Hill’s Shelter Hero Contest page.It’s apparent that caring for shelter animals is a group effort, yet one person can make a big difference to help save lives. If you want to change the world for animals in need, here are some tips for becoming a volunteer.1. Reach out to local shelters.Call your local animal shelter or rescue group to see if they are accepting volunteers.2. Think about your interests and skills.Caring for animals one-on-one is a popular shelter activity, but there are so many more opportunities for volunteers. Whether you’re able to foster in your home, offer professional skills in administration departments or serve as an adoption counselor to new pet parents, volunteer options are truly endless.3. Spread the love.Once you find your volunteer home, spread the love to help pets find homes and encourage friends to volunteer. By sharing posts on social media like the #HillsShelterHeroes contest, hosting fundraising events and simply bragging about that adorable new pooch to your friends, you’re helping to open everyone’s eyes to the growing need for volunteers at shelters and the importance of pet adoption. Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 last_img read more

New online shopping site promises 75% of turnover to charities

eksxhitmg

first_imgNew online shopping site promises 75% of turnover to charities Howard Lake | 8 October 2008 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Digital  15 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis A new online shopping site has launched with the promise of donating 75 per cent of its entire revenue to charitable organisations.www.agoodcause.co.uk has signed up more than 40 charities in the UK to support including Help the Aged, Marie Curie Cancer Care and Christian Aid.The system involves downloading a piece of freeware called AidMaker through which you can select a cause to support and shop at one of the site’s 600 partner stores. Customers pay the normal price for goods, but the retailer donates a part of the total purchase price to the chosen cause. If people elect not to download the freeware, they can still shop, but the money will be distributed equally between all the charities.www.agoodcause.com has been operational in Scandinavia for more than two years and currently works in eight countries including Denmark, the Netherlands, Italy, France and the US. It works with 700 charities globally but has local retailers for each country and a local focus to the site.www.agoodcause.co.uklast_img read more

Heritage organisations unite to strengthen civic society movement

eksxhitmg

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Heritage organisations unite to strengthen civic society movement Howard Lake | 1 June 2009 | News  21 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Managementcenter_img The Civic Society Initiative is being funded and supported by the National Trust, North of England Civic Trust, Campaign to Protect Rural England, and Royal Institute of British Architects among others. It will work with local societies and other community groups to develop a strong champion for civic societies and a network of support that makes their collective voice stronger still.Speaking at the launch and announcing a £50,000 appeal for funds, Griff Rhys Jones said:“The need for a vibrant civic society movement is greater than ever before and we are enormously grateful to the organisations that have rallied round with offers of financial and practical help. With the right support we can build a movement to support and champion community action for local places that is stronger than ever.”The Civic Society Initiative will be led by seasoned campaigner and community advocate Tony Burton. Tony has over 20 years experience as the National Trust’s Director of Strategy and External Affairs and formerly with the Campaign to Protect Rural England, which he left in 2001 as Deputy Director. Tony Burton starts as Director of the Civic Society Initiative with immediate effect. A biographical note is attached.Tony Burton said:“The civic society movement is in the warp and weft of local communities throughout the country. With conventional politics on the rocks, the time is ripe for a rebirth of local democracy which champions the importance of places for people. We urge all those who care for the place where they live to get involved and keep in touch at www.civicsocietyinitiative.org.uk.”NOTES FOR EDITORS1. The Civic Society Initiative was launched in Covent Garden by Griff Rhys Jones, Tony Burton, Fiona Reynolds (Director-General, National Trust) and Laura Sandys (daughter of Duncan Sandys, founder of the Civic Trust). Journalists wishing to attend the launch should contact Ivo Dawnay at [email protected] (07909 925041). Photographs will be available after the event.2. The Civic Trust went into administration in April 2009 after running into financial difficulties.FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:Tony Burton, Director, Civic Society Initiative (t) 020 7981 2881 The civic society movement – one of the country’s unsung treasures – was boosted today by the launch of an initiative to strengthen its network of over 1,000 voluntary civic and amenity societies and 250,000 members.The Civic Society Initiative was launched today (Monday) by Griff Rhys Jones in London’s Covent Garden, scene of a successful civic society campaign against a damaging six lane road scheme in the 1970s. This follows the Civic Trust – which had provided the national voice for civic societies for 50 years – going into administration in April 2009. Information on the Civic Society Initiative and the role and history of the civic society movement is attached.Civic societies provide a focus for voluntary and community action to improve the places where people live, work and relax. They champion the importance of these places to decision makers and opinion formers in business, politics, government, the media, the voluntary sector and elsewhere. They play an essential role in helping individuals and communities to understand and take action to improve the quality of their life through the place where they live. Civic societies promote and celebrate the best of what is inherited from the past and what is developed for the future. They are a fundamental source of civic pride. Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Young newspaper editor freed after six months in prison

eksxhitmg

first_imgNews May 17, 2019 Find out more May 29, 2019 Find out more January 5, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Young newspaper editor freed after six months in prison News The young editor of the weekly New Malika, Nagendra Upadhyaya, was freed on 3 January after being held for six months for supposedly helping a Maoist rebel. He was released two weeks after completing his sentence on the decision of the Kailali district security bureau. He will now have to report to the police every two weeks. He was arrested on 20 July under the anti-terrorist law and was put in Dhangadhi prison. He was reportedly mistreated.One journalist still remains in prison in Nepal. He is Tejnarayan Sapkota of the newspaper Yojana, who has been imprisoned since November 2003.————————————————————-14.09.2005More than 55 journalists arrested and beaten at pro-democracy demonstrationsReporters Without Borders has protested at the Nepalese security forces actions since the start of the month during which they have beaten and arrested at least 55 journalists who were reporting on or joining pro-democracy demonstrations.“Journalists covering marches opposing King Gyanendra are facing the same levels of brutality as those taking part,” it said. “Since the Maoists declared a ceasefire on 3 September, the crackdown has been stepped up to break the advance of the democratic parties. We call for an end to police brutality and for the right to demonstrate peacefully”.Police on 5 September clubbed a score of journalists covering a demonstration in Kathmandu that called for “an end to the dictatorship” One of them, Satyaram Parajuli, was seriously injured. Most of the Nepalese media have spoken out against this violence, that worsened still further the next day, at a new opposition rally.On that day, 6 September, a score of journalists were beaten up, including Bharat Shahi, editor of the weekly Chuli Sandesh, Bhimsen Rajbahak, of the broadcast agency Communication Corner, Kamal Pariyar, of the weekly Jana Sangharsa, Rodan Rai, photographer for the Himalayan Times and Gyanendra Sharma, cameraman for Nepal One TV. Bharat Shahi was beaten about the head by both uniform and plain-clothes police and was rushed to hospital with very serious injuries. Several witnesses reported that an officer – Ganesh KC – gave the order to arrest journalists covering the demonstrations.Three days later, on 9 September, police arrested at least 34 writers and journalists who were shouting slogans in support of greater freedom of expression, in Bhotahiti, in central Kathmandu. They were held for six hours at Mahendra police station before being released.Finally, on 13 September, more than 500 demonstrators, including several journalists, were again manhandled and arrested by police in the capital. At least five of the journalists, including Tilak Mahat, a reporter for the regional daily Lumbini Dainik, and Suresh Sainju, were severely clubbed.This wave of arrests comes after the arrest on 20 July, of Nagendra Upadhyaya, managing editor of the weekly New Malika, based in Teekapur in Kailali district in the far west of Nepal, and reporter for the daily Abhiyan in Mahendranagar, in the same region. The journalist was placed in custody under the ant-terror law, TADO. He was accused by the local administration of helping Maoist militants. A colleague told Reporters Without Borders that the authorities had not produced any proof.The organisation pointed out that journalists Maheshwor Pahari, of the local weekly Rastriya Swabhiman and Tejnarayan Sapkota, of the weekly Yojana, are both still being held in jail. Organisation RSF_en Nepal: RSF’s recommendations to amend controversial Media Council Bill Help by sharing this information NepalAsia – Pacific center_img News Nepalese journalists threatened, attacked and censored over Covid-19 coverage to go further Receive email alerts News Follow the news on Nepal Under Chinese pressure, Nepal sanctions three journalists over Dalai Lama story June 8, 2020 Find out more NepalAsia – Pacific last_img read more

Margarita Fiesta fundraiser

eksxhitmg

first_img Facebook Margarita Fiesta fundraiser West Texas Food BankWest Texas Food Bank has scheduled Forever Full Margarita Fiesta at 7 p.m. March 24 at the Wagner Noël Performing Arts Center, 1310 N. FM 1788, Midland.Activities include a delicious and festive Mexican dinner, a dance party with music by the Spazmatics, a silent auction and a raffle for a Nissan 370 Z.Fiesta cocktail attire is requested.Visit www.501auctions.com/foreverfull to get a head start on the silent auction. Pinterest By admin – March 14, 2018 Collin Sewell talks about new businesses that will be coming to Parks Legado in 2019. Twitter WhatsAppcenter_img Twitter Facebook Local News Pinterest Previous articleJob fairNext articleGUEST VIEW: Schools should use walkouts as teaching moment admin WhatsApplast_img read more

NOAA forecasts near-normal 2019 Atlantic hurricane season

eksxhitmg

first_imgJimVallee/iStock(SILVER SPRING, Md.) — Conditions in the sea and atmosphere are most likely to produce a near-normal Atlantic hurricane season this year, according to a new forecast from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.The federal agency on Thursday released its forecast for the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season, which officially begins June 1 and ends on Nov. 30.There is a 40 percent likelihood of near-normal activity during the period when hurricanes form in the Atlantic Ocean. The chances of an above-normal season or a below-normal season are both 30 percent, according to NOAA.For the entire Atlantic hurricane season, NOAA forecasts there will be a total of nine to 15 named storms (39 mph or higher winds), of which four to eight could become hurricanes (74 mph or higher winds), including two to four major hurricanes (111 mph or higher winds). NOAA warned that the outlook is for overall season activity and doesn’t forecast landfall.An average hurricane season produces 12 named storms, of which six become hurricanes, including three major hurricanes.Seasonal forecasters considered the competing climate factors at play for the this year’s outlook. The ongoing El Nino, a warming of the equatorial Pacific Ocean that increases wind shear over the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, is expected to persist and suppress the intensity of the hurricane season. Meanwhile, the warmer-than-average sea-surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea combined with an enhanced West African monsoon season will counter El Nino’s effects and favor increased hurricane activity, according to NOAA, which falls under the U.S. Department of Commerce.“With the 2019 hurricane season upon us, NOAA is leveraging cutting-edge tools to help secure Americans against the threat posed by hurricanes and tropical cyclones across both the Atlantic and Pacific,” Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross said in a statement Thursday. “Throughout hurricane season, dedicated NOAA staff will remain on alert for any danger to American lives and communities.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Malone: a woman in a hurry

eksxhitmg

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Malone: a woman in a hurryOn 1 Apr 2002 in Personnel Today Beverly Malone, RCN general secretary, is committed to getting nurses’ feetunder the table at every level of the decision-making process.  Nurses should no longer just make thedecision handed down to them, they deserve a centre-stage position, by NicPaton It would have taken someone of exceptional prescience to predict that thefailure of Al Gore to win the presidency of the US back in November 2000 wouldhave a profound impact on UK nurses. But his loss to George W Bush has beenBritain’s gain because it brought Dr Beverly Malone, current general secretaryof the Royal College of Nurses, across the Atlantic. At the time of the election, Malone was President Bill Clinton’s deputyassistant health secretary – the highest position a nurse has held in the USgovernment – but the continuation of her role depended on a Gore win. That’swhy, in June last year, she found herself taking over the reins of the RCN fromChristine Hancock, when the latter moved on to become president of the InternationalCouncil of Nurses. Impressive credentials With two terms as president of the American Nurses Association under herbelt, a seat on Clinton’s Advisory Commission on Consumer Protection andQuality in the Health Care Industry and two listings in Ebony Magazine’s listof the 100 most influential African-Americans, in 1996 and 1998, there is noquestion that Malone is a big hitter. Yet she has come from humble beginnings. Raised in Elizabethtown, Kentucky,she grew up in a southern area of the US that was still racially segregated,before, following integration, making it to the University of Cincinnati in1970 where she studied for a Bachelor’s degree in nursing. This was followed by stints as a psychiatric clinical nurse specialist aswell as studying for a doctorate in clinical psychology from the sameuniversity. She took on a number of further roles with the university, such assetting up a department of clinical nurse specialists and nurse clinicians toprovide in-house and external consultancy. She also established a midwiferynurses programme and started her own private practice in personal therapy andprofessional consultation. In 1986 she moved to become dean of the School of Nursing at North CarolinaAgricultural and Technical State University, during which time she served onvarious public bodies. By 1996 she had made it to the ANA, a body thatrepresents180,000 nurses across the US. The call from Clinton came four yearslater. Firm believer in the NHS Now, sitting in the RCN’s Cavendish Square headquarters in London, Malonecomes across as warm but polished, very sharp and absolutely committed tobattling hard to get nurses a voice at the top tables of the NHS – a healthstructure she evidently admires deeply. “Back in the States the history has been that you fight and grab andscratch for every penny that you can on an individual basis. But I consider theNHS to be the system to have. I believe wholeheartedly in the principle thatcare needs to be free at the point of delivery and that it should beuniversally accessible to everyone. “I am delighted to be able to wake up in a country where this issue isnot the one I have to go out and fight a war about every day, as I had to inthe US – about the underlying, philosophical basis of the system ofcaring,” she says. The RCN has long been a trade union associated with radical demands on payand conditions and a tough, battle-hardened approach to dealing withgovernments. While more than prepared to fight these battles, Malone, assomeone with the clear view of an outsider, is adamant about the need to thinkbeyond the next day’s tussle. “I really believe that if we can get nurses into decision-making places– and I’m talking leadership here – at the table where decisions are made. Thenthere would be less need to be out there scrounging around about pay or otherissues. “Nurses would be shaping the system. That is what I am looking for, notfor us to do things in isolated splendour at the top of a hierarchy. I want tobe around the table with colleagues and I want nurses’ input to be there,”she argues. “I am so discouraged when I see us only taking decisions thatare handed down to us and responding to those in a very reactive way, not ableto shape what it could be like for our patients,” she adds. Greater power for nurses Both the Government and doctors seem, finally, to be heeding her call.Health Secretary Alan Milburn has long recognised the need to give nursesgreater power and autonomy. In February, for instance, he unveiled a raft of new prescribing powers fornurses while Prime Minister Tony Blair pledged greater flexibility in workingpractices for frontline staff and a “highly charged debate” about howhealthcare should be funded. Malone says she believes “wholeheartedly” that the Government islistening to nurses and the medical profession, not least because there is nowso much at stake politically. Perhaps more surprisingly, the BMA in adiscussion document the same month said it might be prepared to abandon thehallowed role of GPs as “gatekeepers” to the NHS in favour of a morenurse-focused approach. It proposed nurses could co-ordinate the care around a patient, so that inprimary care, for instance, nurse practitioners would be the first port of callwith doctors only being called upon when their skills are needed. BMA chairmanDr Ian Bogle even conceded that those working in the NHS needed “to take along, hard look at how they work”. Shortage of nurses This, of course, is all well and good in principle, but if the nurses arenot there to do the job – and 25 per cent of nurses are now aged over 50 – itis simply not going to work. The shortage of nurses, and the need to stop theexodus from the profession is already one of the biggest issues policymakersneed to address, Malone asserts. “How do you convince nurses who feel undervalued that they should stayin the profession maybe another five to 10 years?” she asks. “I think you have to find new ways of working. I really believe thatthere should be newly developed opportunities for nurses who are older so theydo not have to do the same type of work that they did when they were 21, 28 or30.” The age of nursing students is getting older, with the average now 25 to 27rather than the 18-to-20-year-olds of a few years back, making issues of payand opportunities for career progression and lifelong continuing education evenmore critical. “The pay is the single most effective determinant of why nurses stay innursing,” she stresses. Despite all the extra money the Government isputting into the NHS, Malone says she is still “appalled” at how lownurses’ pay remains. “There has to be a big boost for nursing pay to get better. It’s notsomething that can be done in little increments – I have a saying ‘it’s a cinchby the inch but it’s hard by the yard’ – but when it comes to pay we need theyard,” she asserts. She is also horrified by how little thought appears to go into workforceplanning for nurses, something that she believes should be top of the agendawhen there is a recruitment and retention crisis . “I am hoping that the RCN will be able to work with the Government inputting something together that could actually start monitoring workforce andworkforce issues. Whether it’s why people are coming back into nursing or whythey don’t come back, those sorts of questions and research opportunities needto be available,” she says. Occupational health nurses Despite asking for Carol Bannister, the RCN’s OH adviser, to sit in on theinterview, it is obvious that, even with all her other areas of responsibility,Malone has made an effort to brief herself closely on some of the key areas ofconcern for occupational health nurses. “I believe occupational health nurses are some of the most requiredsystems thinkers there are,” she argues, arguing that they often need totake a holistic approach to decision-making. “They have to continually assess the environment and the community.They have to be thinking about how they can shape the response of theircorporation so that it is more accessible to the people who work there.” Not enough of this type of thinking takes place in the NHS, she adds, andoccupational health nurses could be used more to pass on best practice thinkingto, say, acute care nurses. “What can we do in the system to make sure our patients’ stay is asinfection-free and healthy as possible, for instance. How do we make sure thatit is not complicated by other things?” Ultimately, nurses need to stop thinking of themselves as people who simplycarry out the orders of the great and good and realise they have something ofvalue to contribute to the decision-making process, she argues. She cites theexample of some private finance initiative-built hospitals that have been constructedwith corridors too narrow to turn trolleys around, or where nurses cannot seepatients from their nursing station. Malone would like to see the new strategic health authorities being set up”clearly reflecting nursing input at every level” and primary caretrusts similarly putting nurses centre stage in the decision-making process. “I’m talking about making sure that nurses are involved indecision-making, shaping how care is delivered, how buildings are built and howsystems are managed. And it is not just for the glory of nursing, it is forpatient care and that’s why I feel we cannot be patient about this and use itas a long-term goal,” she says. “I think that we should do some knocking of heads together, in a verypolite and courteous but nevertheless very clear and dramatic way, to say thatif you are really talking about building a patient-centred environment, whetherit be in a workplace or a PCT or acute care trust, it has to be that thepatient is central. Because nurses are advocates for patients and deliver 80per cent of their care, they need to be involved in that decision-makingprocess. “It’s a wake-up call, but it’s a win for everyone. At times some peoplemay say ‘oh those nurses they just want more’ but it really is about changingthe system and making sure patients get what they need.” When Malone visits nurses around the country – which she does frequently –the most common complaint is the sense of being undervalued andunder-recognised, she says. There’s a disparity between the high perception inwhich nurses are held within the public eye and the attitudes of doctors,ministers and administrators to their nurse colleagues. “There’s a real gap between how the public views nurses and how we aretreated. There is nowhere that I go when I talk to nurses that this issue isnot raised,” she explains. For occupational health nurses this would mean being in a position wheretheir decisions are affecting the way their company operates, either becausethey are on the board or because they have access to it. “I would like to hear about some occupational health nurses who weresitting on the boards of their companies having a direct way of feeding backinformation about health and safety, how they save that organisation money, howthey get people back into employment and how they are planning and working todo that successfully. To me that would be a measure of success,” she says.With the political clock ticking loudly, Blair and Milburn are men in ahurry to see real improvements in the NHS. Equally, for Malone, getting nursesto the table where decisions are made is a vital part of this process. It needsto sit beside the battle for this percentage pay rise or that number of extranurses. “I believe it has to be short-term goal. I want to see, soon, nurses atthe decision-making table, with communities, regardless of who they are, havingan appreciation that nurses are the ones who are managing the system of care. Ithink we need to be very impatient about this,” she stresses. Comments are closed. last_img read more

Tullow Oil to sell Ugandan assets to Total for $575m

eksxhitmg

first_imgThe assets involved in the deal between Tullow Oil and Total are the Uganda Lake Albert development project and the East African Crude Oil Pipeline System Total agrees to buy the Ugandan assets of Tullow Oil. (Credit: Zbynek Burival/Unsplash) Tullow Oil has agreed to offload its Ugandan assets to Total for $575m, which includes the former’s stake in the Uganda Lake Albert project.As per the terms of the deal, the French oil and gas company will acquire Tullow Oil’s 33.33% stake in the Uganda Lake Albert development project, which covers the exploration licenses – EA1, EA1A, EA2 and EA3A.The company will also be acquiring Tullow Oil’s stake in the 1,445km long East African Crude Oil Pipeline System (EACOP project), being laid between Uganda and Tanzania with an investment of $3.5bn.Total will make an initial payment of $500m at the closing of the deal, and the remaining $75m when a final investment decision is taken on the Uganda Lake Albert development project. Additionally, Total will make conditional payments, which will be linked to production and oil price, triggered when Brent prices are more than $62/bbl.The onshore Lake Albert Development Project, which is located in the Lake Albert Rift Basin, is estimated to have over 1.5 billion barrels of discovered recoverable resources.The onshore oil project is anticipated to yield about 230,000 barrels of oil per day (bopd) at plateau.In August 2019, Tullow Oil, owing to a tax dispute with the Ugandan government, had to scrap its deal of selling its operated stake of 33.3% in the Lake Albert Development Project to co-venturers Total and CNOOC for about $910m.Total chairman and CEO Patrick Pouyanné said: “We are pleased to announce that a new agreement has been reached with Tullow to acquire their entire interests in the Lake Albert development project for less than 2$/bbl in line with our strategy of acquiring long-term resources at low cost, and that we have an agreement with the Uganda government on the fiscal framework.“This acquisition will enable us, together with our partner CNOOC, to now move the project forward toward FID, driving costs down to deliver a robust long-term project.”Tullow Oil to use proceeds from the sale to reduce its debtTullow Oil said that the sale of its Ugandan assets is part of its strategy to reduce its cost base and manage its portfolio to cut down net debt and consolidate its balance sheet.Tullow Oil executive chair Dorothy Thompson said: “This deal is important for Tullow and forms the first step of our programme of portfolio management. It represents an excellent start towards our previously announced target of raising in excess of US$1 billion to strengthen the balance sheet and secure a more conservative capital structure.“We have already made good progress with the Government of Uganda and the Uganda Revenue Authority in moving this Transaction forward, including by agreeing the principles on tax treatment, and we will work closely with the Government, Total and CNOOC over the coming months to reach completion as quickly as possible.”The closing of the deal is subject to the approval of Tullow Oil’s shareholders, customary regulatory and government approvals, and also on CNOOC exercising its pre-emption rights on 50% of the transaction.last_img read more