Morphometric and ultrastructural features of the ventricular myocardium of the haemoglobin-less icefish Chaenocephalus aceratus

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first_img1. The relationship between heart ventricle weight and body weight has been determined for three species of Antarctic fish with respiratory pigments (Notothenia gibberifrons, Notothenia neglecta and Notothenia rossii) and the haemoglobin-less icefish Chaenocephulus aceratus.2.2. Relative heart weights of Notothenidae are similar to those of other teleosts whilst those of Channichthyidae are similar to those reported for tuna and small mammals.3.3. The volume densities of mitochondria and myofibrils for ventricular myocytes were 0.47 and 0.25 respectively. The values for mitochondrial volume density are higher and those for myofibrillar volume density lower than for most vertebrate hearts.4.4. Some unusual characteristics of these mitochondria are reported and discussed in relation to the unique constraints characterizing this type of heart.last_img read more

The best phrase in property details: “Close to Waitrose”

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first_imgEstate agents are generally aware of their various local ‘attractions’, such as ‘2 minutes to the beach’ or ‘5 minute walk to the station’ but now, says Property Solvers, the best draw is the property’s proximity to a Waitrose store.The average price of a property within 1/4 mile of a Waitrose store is £469,933 – or 107% above the national average. Voted as the best supermarket in a survey conducted by Which? earlier this year, Waitrose remains firmly positioned as one of the nation’s most well-recognised premium brands, with store appearance, staff, helpfulness and higher standards were all highly praised.Property Solvers’ recent research took the average values of 24,874 property sales over the last two years within a quarter of a mile of one of the Waitrose stores across the country.The data excluded 36 stores – those with no residential homes close by, such as Little Waitrose stores at petrol/motorway service stations and larger ones found in shopping/heavy commercial developments. It also excluded areas where no residential properties within the quarter of a mile radius were sold in the last two years, leading to a total of 315 stores analysed.The figures were compared with average sold property prices within the same postcode area, using sold prices lodged at HM Land Registry (as opposed to asking or advertised prices).Tasty resultsAverage sale price of 24,874 properties within a quarter of a mile of Waitrose analysed: £469,933. This is almost 107% above the national average of £227,001;Average price of properties in the wider postcode areas where a Waitrose store is located stood at £1,220,296 – or 160% higher than within a quarter of a mile and 438% more than the Land Registry House Price Index over the last 2 years;19.4% of properties within a quarter of a mile from a Waitrose store were under the UK national average over the last 2 years;Cheapest properties within a quarter of a mile of a Waitrose store were in Wolverhampton (WV2), Preston (PR5), Sheffield (S11), Northumberland (NE46) and Northwich (CW9);The most expensive properties located within a quarter of a mile of a Waitrose store were in Central London – namely: Belgravia (SW1X), Marylebone (W1U), Knightsbridge (SW3), Kings Road (SW3), Notting Hill Gate (W11).Impact on house pricesProperty Solvers’ data collection demonstrated that owning a property close to a Waitrose largely translates to it being significantly higher in value than the national average.Co-founder, Ruban Selvanyagam said, “It comes as little surprise that Waitrose stores can be found in some of the most affluent areas including a prime central London, many parts of Surrey, Sunningdale, Henley-on-Thames, Beaconsfield, Windsor, Rickmansworth and Gerrards Cross.“Prices are even higher when buying homes in the same postcode – i.e. beyond a quarter of a mile of a Waitrose.”Selvanayagam added, “Although many Waitrose stores can be found in town centres and cities with varied demographics, any new store is unlikely to emerge in an area where the overall profile of the local population is at the lower end of the social class spectrum.”Ruban Selvanyagam Waitrose close to Waitrose best supermarket Property solvers average house prices Sheila Manchester July 9, 2019The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Housing Market » The best phrase in property details: “Close to Waitrose” previous nextHousing MarketThe best phrase in property details: “Close to Waitrose”New research finds homes near Waitrose average prices 107% above the national norm.Sheila Manchester9th July 201901,364 Viewslast_img read more

St Benet’s welcomes female undergraduates for the first time

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first_imgSt Benet’s Hall has taken in its first mixed gender cohort of undergraduates this week, after deciding to admit female students in 2013. Previously, the last college to go co-educational was St Hilda’s, admitting men in 2008.Female graduate students were admitted in 2014, while the Permanent Private Hall awaited separate accommodation to become available to house new female undergraduates. New facilities were deemed necessary, due to the six monks who are part of the Hall and live on site.St Benet’s, which has just under 50 undergraduates, has now acquired a second site next to University Parks, allowing for the completion of its co-educational admissions this year.JCR President Samuel Hodson commented, “Having already accepted graduate women, I am delighted that St Benet’s is welcoming undergraduate women to the Hall this year. Everyone is excited to be extending our unrivalled sense of community to the new members; things are well underway with women making up half of the undergraduate intake this year.” Until 2012, the master of Benet’s was always a Benedictine monk, and the hall retains a monastic prior and a chaplain, both of whom are monks. Students do not have to be Catholics, but all are asked to be supportive of monastic life and values.Enthusiasm for the occasion extends throughout the Hall, with the Senior Tutor, Dr Santha Bhattarcharji, telling Cherwell, “We are all delighted to be welcoming our first mixed undergraduate intake, and everything seems to going well so far.”Kelly Carleton, the student Women’s Officer at the Hall, told Cherwell, “The St. Benet’s ethos is one of community and egalitarianism, so it has been exciting to continue this spirit in welcoming undergraduate women this year.“This is an historic moment for the Hall, and yet I have been pleased with how natural the transition has been. I am looking forward to seeing where this integrated student community leads St. Benet’s in the future.”Alice Gent, one of the nine female freshers at Benet’s, said, “I Googled it and I was terrified. I looked at it and it was all male until this year, it’s got a history of being incredibly conservative, it’s got one of the highest numbers of Bullingdon Club membership and I was like ‘I’m a left- wing leaning female young person, I’m going to hate it’. I honestly thought I should go to Durham instead. “But it’s so much more welcoming than other colleges, I’ve got a friend at another college and they’ve only hung out with the freshers. But ours is so small, you communicate with all of the years. There’s so much more mixing, with postgrads as well.” Eleanor Lambert, another first-year at St Benet’s, said, “all of the 18 undergrads are living in their own building in Norham Gardens, so it’s kind of like being in a house with 17 other people.center_img “I had a quick tour before my pooled interview, and the guy kept saying that it wouldn’t be a typical Oxford experience, and at the time, I just wanted the typical experience. Actually, the nice thing is it’s small enough that everyone knows everyone.”last_img read more

12-year-old named as youngest Oxford organist in history

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first_imgLouis Moss, aged twelve, has become the youngest person ever to play the organ for an Oxford University college after gaining a music scholarship at Jesus College.Despite only taking up the organ a year ago, Moss, from Chipping Norton in Oxfordshire, will play the organ for hymns in Jesus College chapel services from this Spring.The scholarship scheme is run in conjunction with the Young Organ Scholars’ Trust, and strives to reverse the declining number of youngsters learning to play the organ, after it was estimated only around 750 young people are learning to play the instrument in the UK.After the news was announced, Louis, a pupil at The Cotswold School in Bourton-on-the-Water, Gloucestershire, said: “It is great to play such an amazing instrument. I am looking forward to improving further through my scholarship at Jesus College.”Speaking to the Telegraph, Louis added he was “really pleased” to have the opportunity, and discussed his ambition to have a career in music: “I think I will go along that career path. I’m quite interested in composing and conducting so I might be a conductor or composer or something musical.”Sir Nigel Shadbolt, Principal of Jesus College, commented: “We are delighted to have Louis with us. By starting a young music scholarship scheme here—the first of its kind in an Oxford or Cambridge college—we are creating more opportunities to connect local state schools with Jesus College, through music.“By beginning this project in conjunction with the Young Organ Scholars’ Trust we are helping gifted young people to have the chance to play the organ when they couldn’t have dreamt of it before.”Speaking exclusively to Cherwell, Katharine Pardee, Betts Fellow in Organ Studies at Oxford University, said: “The organ is a wonderful instrument with a repertoire and history longer than any other, yet in part because of its nearly-exclusive connection with the mainstream Church it is in serious danger of disappearing, or at least becoming only a museum-piece.“It is vitally important to come up with creative ways to introduce new generations to the excitement, thrill, and beauty of the organ. Jesus College and Chaplain Megan Daffern should be applauded for their innovative approach in giving this opportunity to Louis”.The news was also received well by Oxford students, with Oxford University Music Society President David Palmer telling Cherwell: “Musical life in Oxford is characterised by inclusivity. For example, the wide range of ensembles and performance opportunities allow for anyone to get involved, regardless of style, ability, course of study or other commitments.“Louis’ scholarship is in keeping with this important aspect of musical life in Oxford; it is encouraging to see the University actively address the issue of the decline in young organists by recognising Louis’ ability in this way.”Oxford University offers fifty undergraduate organ scholarships, but struggles to fill more than thirty a year. A donor will pay for Louis special £1,000-a-year scholarship for the first year, and then by the college for the two years after.last_img read more

Are You Cyber Ready?

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first_imgAccording to a 2017 survey conducted by Small Business Trends, almost half of all cyber-attacks that occur on a daily basis affect small businesses. Of the targeted small businesses, 60 percent closed within six months due to the financial burden.No matter the size of your business, the scope of online transactions, data storage and communications make us all a target of cyber threat.The University of Southern Indiana is bringing cybersecurity information and resources to the tristate region from 8 a.m. to Noon Wednesday, October 24 at the inaugural Southwest Indiana Cyber Conference. The conference is $60 to attend.“We want to help small businesses be more aware of the cyber threat landscape that is impacting the region and understand what the legal implications and responsibilities are when it comes to cyber threats,” said Dr. Gabriela Mustata Wilson, associate professor of Health Informatics.National thought leaders on cybersecurity will give the following presentations:Are you able to detect your cyber vulnerability? By Che Bhatia and Thys DeBruynEngage in a low-cost cyber vulnerability assessment.A national perspective on cyber readiness.Learn about the nature and scope of cybercrime and nation-state activities to increase the level of awareness of the cyber threats posed in today’s environment.Are you insured for a cybersecurity breach? By Adam IraExplore Cyber Insurance options and know the gaps in existing insurance that small businesses may have.What can the Indiana Executive Council on Cybersecurity do for you? By Chetrice Mosley and Tad StahlLearn how to prepare and defend your organization and the state from cyber-attacks and increase the nation’s cybersecurity workforce.“We put together this conference to raise awareness of cyber threats on businesses in this region,” said Dr. Kenneth Shemroske, associate professor of Computer Information Systems. “We want regional businesses to know that there are state resources, which may be leveraged, in the fight against these cyber threats.”Registration is available online or by calling USI Outreach and Engagement at 812-464-1989. More information is available at USI.edu/swi-cyber.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Watch George Porter, Anders Osborne & More Jam Out At NOLA Crawfish Festival

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first_imgUpdate 4/12/17: With the second annual NOLA Crawfish Festival just around the corner (May 1-3 at Central City BBQ), we decided to revisit one of the standout sets of last year’s event!What do you get when you bring together thousands of pounds of crawfish, thousands of gallons of beer, and George Porter, Jr., Anders Osborne, Jason Crosby, Terence Higgins, Dave Malone and Billy Iuso? Well, in the case of the last set of the inaugural NOLA Crawfish Festival, you end up with a capacity crowd of smiling people eating, drinking and dancing!The new festival was held on the “daze between” Jazz Fest weekends, and the all-star lineup merged together with ease. Whether it was Radiators’ guitarist Dave Malone trading licks with NOLA staple Billy Iuso, or George Porter Jr.’s thumping basslines, or Higgins’ powerful rhythms, everyone in the capacity crowd was shaking it! The band even welcomed sit-ins from Jason Crosby and Anders Osborne throughout the set, only adding to the magic with their soul drenched musicianship.The band kept things loose and jammy, and no song went under ten minutes as the players took turns stretching the elements. Fortunately, we had our own Rex Thomson on hand to capture the magic at the NOLA Brewery. Without further ado, check out The Crawfish All-Stars at their finest!“Papaya”“Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues”“George’s Jam”“Them Changes”“Do or Die” The second annual NOLA Crawfish Festival will take place at Central City BBQ during the days between Jazz Fest weekends, May 1-3. This year’s lineup includes George Porter Jr., Eric Krasno, John Medeski, Luther Dickinson, Jon Cleary, Nigel Hall, and so many more! Get tickets and more info here.last_img read more

Notre Dame bicycle shop remains closed

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first_imgCampus bike enthusiasts will have to pedal on without the Notre Dame Bike Shop, which closed last semester for the foreseeable future. However, student bike technicians said they are working hard to reopen in a new location. Phillip Johnson, director of Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP), said the shop’s garage in the Old Security Building was reallocated in December to support a growing need for academic space on campus. NDSP cannot run the program without the garage, he said. Johnson said the bike shop’s services started small and expanded gradually. “A number of years ago, NDSP was involved in making minor repairs to abandoned bikes that were auctioned at the beginning of the school year,” he said. “Over time, students came to ask for minor repairs.” Sophomore Chris Glueck, a student employee, said the shop provided free bicycle repair services for students, faculty and staff. The shop supplied labor and used parts from abandoned bikes, which are now recycled rather than auctioned. “It’s repairs that would cost people a hundred dollars that we do for free. We also [gave] advice on bikes to buy and register them,” he said. “We [had] a high success rate.” Glueck said student bike technicians have worked with the Office of Sustainability to promote the use of bikes for commuting and the reopening of a bike repair garage on campus. Rachel Novick, education and outreach program manager with the Office of Sustainability, said the University supports biking for its carbon-free mode of transportation and reduction of local air pollution. She said the Bike Shop provided an important service to the campus community. “Every biker needs an occasional tune-up for both performance and safety, and the bike shop has enabled countless students, faculty and staff members to keep their bikes in top form,” she said. “We hope that a new home can be found for it in the near future.” Johnson said he is not certain the Bike Shop will reopen as it is not part of NDSP’s core campus safety services, but he said he realizes how important it is to the Notre Dame campus. “This will depend on what space is available and who might be in the best position to operate the shop,” Johnson said. “We see the value in biking … It’s healthy and supports sustainability.” Glueck said ideally the shop would reopen in a new garage or move into an existing unused space on campus. He said he hopes the shop will open in the near future to further provide services for students and their bikes. “All we want is a place to put our tools and somewhere to check into. We’re looking for a new home and we do good work,” Glueck said.last_img read more

Notre Dame professor speaks at College’s annual McMahon Aquinas Lecture

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first_imgKatelyn Valley | The Observer Notre Dame philosophy professor David O’Connor spoke Thursday night about Thomas Aquinas’s teachings.While developing his lecture, O’Connor said he used it as an opportunity to reflect. “For me, returning to the text of Thomas Aquinas to think about this lecture has been a rather chastening experience of reflecting on the contemporary times that we live in and also reflecting on me,” O’Connor said. O’Connor discussed the trend of considering oneself as above his or her contemporaries, especially through the usage of satire and irony. “Thomas Aquinas gives us many resources to overcome this temptation of self regard, this temptation to pull ourselves above the people we teach, and the people we learn from,” O’Connor said. “In my experience, the dominant form of academic wit is satire and irony. It was many years into my career as a satirist and an ironist before I recognized the moral hazard in that approach to wit.”Instead, O’Connor proposed that the approach taken should be more akin to feeling gratitude and appreciation for those around us, which he said he finds within Aquinas’s work.“Thomas’s specific genius is to reflect back to us the complexity of this tradition,” he said. O’Connor also said Aquinas did not see the vision or knowledge of God’s existence to be up to “the standards of philosophical demonstration,” because it was not something you could easily prove with a theorem. He said it was a different kind of knowledge. “It’s the kind of knowledge you have when you are willing to love somebody,” O’Connor said. “It’s the kind of knowledge you have when you accept that there is something mysterious in that person you love, and you don’t require that you understand them fully to be understanding of them.”In addition, O’Connor explored Aquinas’s interpretation that once one begins to comprehend, the wonder they experience fades. He said this is especially notable with the wonder experienced as a result of the recent solar eclipse. “Thomas carries over from Aristotle the suggestion that your wonder ends when your comprehension begins,” O’Connor said. “Now once you really understand what causes that eclipse, it’s not a wonder anymore. I don’t think that’s true, and I think the recent experience with the solar eclipse shows us that. Things don’t stop being wonderful because we understand them.” O’Connor closed his lecture reflecting on Aquinas’s philosophy in relation to his idea of comprehension. “Certainly there are moments when it might seem that Thomas Aquinas’s philosophy makes too great a demand on a kind of demonstrative knowledge on a comprehensive grasp, but overall its spiritual exercise is an exercise in … gratitude, in acceptance,” O’Connor said. “For Thomas Aquinas — it seems to me — philosophy begins in wonder, and it ends in gratitude.”Tags: philosophy, Thomas Aquinas, wonder Saint Mary’s hosted its annual McMahon Aquinas Lecture in Philosophy, featuring Notre Dame professor of philosophy David O’Connor, on Thursday night. The lecture was titled “Love More Than You Know: The Tao of Thomas Aquinas.” “The reason I called this ‘The Tao of Thomas Aquinas’ is I want to get away from the doctrines or the arguments of Thomas Aquinas, and get to a way of appreciating Thomas as a kind of spiritual director, as a mentor who leads us systematically on a path of spiritual discipline and spiritual ascent,” O’Connor said.last_img read more

Come From Away Sets Broadway Dates

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first_img‘Come From Away'(Photo: Kevin Berne) Come From Away View Comments Related Showscenter_img Broadway dates have been set for the much-buzzed about Come From Away. The new musical, which follows a group of travelers stranded on 9/11, will begin performances on February 18, 2017. Opening night is scheduled for March 12 at a Shubert theater to be revealed in due course.The production has also announced that it will honor the residents of Newfoundland and Labrador and the “come from aways” whose lives inspired the tuner with two benefit concert performances at Gander’s hockey arena, The Steele Community Centre, on October 29. 100% of the revenue from the shows, which will star the Broadway and Toronto company, is set to be donated to local Newfoundland charities that support the affected communities.With a book, music and lyrics by Irene Sankoff and David Hein, Come From Away will be directed by Christopher Ashley and choreographed by Kelly Devine. In a heartbeat, 38 planes and 6,579 passengers were forced to land in Gander, Newfoundland, doubling the population of one small town on the edge of the world. On September 11, 2001 the world stopped. On September 12, their stories moved us all.The cast will include Chad Kimball, Jenn Colella, Petrina Bromley, Geno Carr, Joel Hatch, Rodney Hicks, Kendra Kassebaum, Lee MacDougall, Caesar Samayoa, Q. Smith, Astrid Van Wieren and Sharon Wheatley.After acclaimed engagements at La Jolla Playhouse and Seattle Repertory Theatre, the new tuner will now head to Washington D.C.’s Ford’s Theatre (September 2 through October 9), and Toronto’s Royal Alexandra Theatre (November 15 through January 8). The Broadway company is also set to play Toronto. from $49.00last_img read more

The darker side of social media

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first_imgIf you operate on any of the more popular social media platforms for your bank or credit union, you know that member or customer complaints can get pretty nasty online. For some reason, people feel emboldened to say things from behind the keyboard that they might not say to another person’s face.A few weeks ago, fast food giants Wendy’s and Burger King had a somewhat heated exchange when discussing their relative value meals on Twitter. I’ll try to forget about how creepy I find the Burger King “King” when discussing the exchange.Wendy’s shared a tweet about its new “four for $4” value meal. The next day, Burger King responded with a tweet about its “five for $4″ value meal that also included the zinger “five for $4, because five is better than four.”Then it got interesting.A Twitter follower of Wendy’s pointed the Burger King tweets out to them, egging them on with “what are you firing back?”Wendy’s quickly tweeted “edible food.”Daaaaaang.Although Wendy’s did remove the tweet, it’s out there forever and plenty of people saw it.All burns aside, what can credit unions learn from this exchange?Number one – don’t get involved in social media wars with your competitors.Number two – you will never ever ever win an online debate with a member or customer.The member/customer could be 147% wrong, but once they take their grievance to social media, your one and only recourse is to address their concern and invite them to take it up with you in it off-line forum. Any other response will more than likely generate an angrier response from the consumer, and the one who ends up looking bad is almost always the financial institution. continue reading » 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more