AMERICAN AIRLINES UPGRADING DALLAS SERVICE AT EVANSVILLE REGIONAL AIRPORT WITH LARGER JETS New First…

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first_imgAmerican Airlines began service between Evansville and Dallas in June 2005. The airline also provides nonstop service to Charlotte and Chicago from Evansville.American Airlines’ flights from Evansville are available for ticketing at www.aa.com. an increase of more than 14,000 departing seats annually and approximately 30,000 extra seats to the Evansville market.Leslie Fella, Evansville Regional Airport Director of Marketing and Air Service, said the aircraft upgrades were based on performance and potential. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Evansville Regional Airport announced today that American Airlines has scheduled a major upgrade to their Dallas service provided at EVV with added capacity and first class seats.Starting April 4, 2017, all of EVV’s Dallas weekday flights and one Saturday flight will be served with a CRJ-900 aircraft, which has nine first class seats and 76 total seats. The Dallas Fort Worth (DFW) route is currently served with a 50 seat ERJ-145 aircraft. The larger jets represent “We increased our frequency to Dallas from one daily round trip to two in November, and our market is handling the increase in seats very well,” said Fella. “The larger jets are a result of this customer demand, and as our performance continues on this positive trend, American Airlines will be more likely to keep the larger aircraft in our market and potentially add more.”Fella said that the addition of the bigger planes to Dallas from American Airlines is a testament Airport passengers have found the nonstop service between Evansville and Dallas Fort Worth an ideal travel opportunity.As American Airlines’ largest domestic hub, DFW offers more than 800 daily flights to nearly 200 destinations in 29 countries. to the airlines confidence in the market, the community’s support for Evansville Regional Airport and the airport’s continued commitment to bring great air service options to the region.“We are continually pleased with American Airlines’ support in our market – they have taken note of the fact that people in Evansville love the nonstop flights to DFW and have answered the region’s desire for more seats and a first class product,” said Fella. “With the additional seats and more amenities, we suspect that we’ll see even stronger performance in our market.”Doug Joest, Evansville Regional Airport Executive Director, said the new CRJ-900s to Dallas will bring significant value to area leisure and business travelers.“The larger jets to Dallas will immediately benefit area businesses and leisure travelers with more opportunity to access the Dallas area, the west coast and international markets, while also providing the travel conveniences that our customers demand,” said Joest.Joest said with so many travel options available with just one stop, many Evansville Regionallast_img read more

FIG acquires savoury pastry firms

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first_imgThe Food Investment Group (FIG) has bought two bakery businesses that specialise in savoury pastry products.The two operations are quiche specialist Thomas Food Partnership in Sheffield, which employs over 100 staff and supplies Morrisons and Waitrose; and Milton Keynes-based family company Giles Foods, which employs 110 staff and supplies Asda, Morrisons and Somerfield. Giles Foods has facilities at sites in Milton Keynes, Telford and Warminster, producing a range of breads, flans, quiches and Danish pastries.The businesses will come under the umbrella of a newly created Pastry Group, which will have a combined annual turnover of about £25 million.FIG was set up in 2004 by Bill Hazeldean, formerly of seafood company Macrae Food Group, and merger and acquisition expert Pat Pocock. Both have been looking at potential acquisitions since their completion of the sale of the Fraserburgh-based Macrae Food Group to Young’s Blue-crest in 2004. These are its first major purchases. Mr Hazeldean said: “Thomas Food and Giles Foods have a strong market position and, with this particular platform, we are confident we can build a successful business, concentrating on the quality end of the bakery market.”FIG has appointed former Macrae chief executive Cameron Brown to head up the Pastry Group. Mr Pocock said: “We have institutional backing to invest in a number of food businesses and we have great confidence in our first step with these two firms. Over the next few months, we expect to complete more transactions.”last_img read more

Corbett sentenced for deadly attack on Goshen College professor, wife

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first_imgIndianaLocalNews Previous articleMurder conviction overturned for man accused in toddler’s deathNext articleKroger to help distribute COVID-19 vaccinations Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Google+ Pinterest Facebook Facebook WhatsApp WhatsApp Google+ Twitter Twitter Corbett sentenced for deadly attack on Goshen College professor, wife By Jon Zimney – December 29, 2020 0 442 Pinterest (Photo supplied/Elkhart County Jail) The man convicted of killing a Goshen College professor and trying to kill his wife during a break=in has been sentenced to 115 years in prison. Winston Corbett did not speak during his sentencing hearing on Monday, Dec. 28. Corbett was convicted back in November after a years-long investigation into the death of Goshen College professor James Miller and the attempted murder of Miller’s wife.The Prosecuting Attorney’s Office of Elkhart County released the following statement:In the early morning hours of October 9, 2011, an intruder broke into the home of the James and Linda Miller family in Goshen, Indiana, where he viciously attacked them, stabbing each multiple times, before pursing James outside and inflicting even more injuries.  Mrs. Miller was able to call 911 to summon help, and survived, but Mr. Miller succumbed to his fatal wounds. During the initial police investigation, crime scene investigators collected and preserved hundreds of items of evidence.  Although Detectives interviewed dozens of witnesses and pursued hundreds of leads, the investigation went without an identified credible suspect for approximately seven (7) years.   In 2017, Detective Nick McCloughen, an Officer of the Goshen Police Department assigned to the Elkhart County Homicide Unit, had assumed responsibility for the investigation and maintained communication with Mrs. Miller.  After conversations with Mrs. Miller, and training exposure to the investigative concept of genetic genealogy utilized by other law enforcement agencies in the United States, Detective McCloughen pursued genetic genealogy analysis, and the investigation began to take on a new perspective.Genetic genealogy is a tool that investigators can use to develop possible leads based upon comparing DNA markers obtained from certain evidence at a crime scene, with public genetic genealogy databases.  No raw genetic data is shared, or even identified, only the location and amount of DNA on certain genetic markers commonly used for identification in the scientific and law enforcement community.  Highly experienced professionals then cross-reference DNA results with other data sources used in traditional genealogy, such as census records, vital records, obituaries, and newspaper articles, to build family trees of possible leads.  Further analysis allows researchers and law enforcement professionals to narrow down a pool of possible suspects to a region, a set of families, or even, possibly, to an individual. Upon receiving an investigative lead from Parabon NanoLabs, Inc., the genetic genealogy lab that assisted in the Miller investigation, the Elkhart County Homicide Unit looked deeper into individuals who, at the time, lived within about a mile of the Miller’s home. In November of 2018, formal charges of Murder and Attempted Murder were filed by Prosecuting Attorney Vicki Elaine Becker against Winston E. Corbett, now 26 years of age, from Goshen, Indiana, as the investigation had finally resulted in the identification of the intruder.  The case against Corbett was presented to a jury in early November, 2020.  As the evidence unfolded, the jury heard from numerous witnesses regarding their observations the night of the attack, the collection of evidence from the scene, and from DNA experts regarding their roles in the analysis of evidence.  Out of dozens of samples of blood stains found at the scene, mostly attributed to Mr. and Mrs. Miller, scientists discovered two samples of DNA identified as a mixture of Winston Corbett and Mr. Miller, and a single-source sample located within the home identified as the DNA of Winston Corbett.  Corbett testified on his own behalf, calling the actions of whomever committed the attack “sadistic”, but denying involvement. Corbett’s attorney also called an expert witness who described how he changed the parameters from how the DNA mixtures were originally evaluated by the Indiana State Police scientists, and came to different conclusions regarding the mixtures.  However, Corbett’s expert did not re-evaluate the single-source sample, instead commenting that the Indiana State Police evaluation of all other samples was reasonable. After almost two weeks of trial, the jury returned a verdict of guilty on both charges. Sentencing was held today in the Elkhart Circuit Court, where Judge Michael Christofeno handed down a maximum sentence of 65 years on Count I, Murder, and 50 years on Count II, Attempted Murder, consecutive to each other for a total of 115 years in prison, commenting on his own observations of the defendant’s level of depravity and sociopathic behaviors and attitudes. Deputy Prosecutor Donald Pitzer argued that Corbett’s use of the word “sadistic,” commonly defined as “taking pleasure from inflicting harm on other people,” was an appropriate word to encompass the heinous acts of the defendant. Prosecuting Attorney Becker attributes the successful prosecution of this horrible crime to the thorough and skilled work of the crime scene investigators and other officers of the Goshen Police Department, the creative and relentless pursuit of justice by investigators of the Elkhart County Homicide Unit, and the professional and talented scientists of the Indiana State Police Laboratory Division, as without the talents of any of these agencies, this crime would not likely have been solved.  The Miller family has demonstrated their faith as a driving factor in moving forward with their lives, notwithstanding the trauma they have experienced, and Mrs. Becker honors such in appreciating the patience they have afforded the State while diligently working to find justice and hold this threat to our community accountable for his actions.last_img read more

Press release: Welsh Secretary provides platform to discuss West Wales Parkway

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first_imgWelsh Secretary Alun Cairns will meet Assembly Members, local councillors and members of the Swansea Business Forum today to formally open discussions on UK Government plans for a ‘West Wales Parkway’ railway station at the former Felindre steelworks site north of Swansea.The idea of a new parkway-style station serving west Wales was in the Top 20 requests made by rail users during a recent consultation on the future of the Great Western franchise.Now an independent study carried out by one of the UK’s leading transport experts has concluded that a new station would deliver major journey time savings for passengers travelling from west Wales to Cardiff of up to a quarter of an hour each way, by cutting the need to travel through the centre of Swansea.The report by Professor Stuart Cole, Emeritus Professor of Transport at the University of South Wales indicates that the station would reduce congestion on the M4 and major roads by encouraging more commuters to travel by rail. The station would also provide improved connectivity in and out of Swansea and between communities across south west Wales including Llanelli, Ammanford and Gorseinon while protecting existing services to Swansea and Neath.Secretary of State for Wales Alun Cairns said: A new station for this region will be west Wales’ ticket to greater opportunity, through faster journey times and greater connectivity with other modes of public transport which will provide an attractive offer to investors and save commuters time on their journeys. The Swansea Bay City Region is important to both the Welsh and UK economy and it’s by working together with the Welsh Government and local partners that we can maximise its potential. I look forward to hearing the views of those local business and authority leaders to hear how we can best deliver on their ambitious plans for the future. ENDS Read the report in full on our websitelast_img read more

A Year in Review: 2018

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first_imgFireworks drew a large crowd and lit up the sky over Prescott Field in Farmington Tuesday night. (Photo by Don Waterhouse)Members of the Maine State Police tactical team on the Temple Road. (Photo by Amber Kapiloff)Another year has come to an end in Franklin County. Here’s hoping that everyone has a fun (and safe!) new year.In what has become an annual tradition, the Daily Bulldog takes a look back at some of the stories that drew the highest traffic over the past 12 months. Each story, ranging from important to trivial, heart-breaking to heart-warming, drew the most visits over a month-long period through either one or multiple appearances in Bulldog articles.January – Murder-suicide kills two in TempleThe new year began with tragedy in Temple, after the bodies of a husband and wife were discovered inside their home on the Temple Road on Jan. 9. According to police, dispatchers were contacted early that morning by a male caller who threatened to shoot himself. Local police and, later, the state police tactical team and negotiators arrived at the Temple Road address that morning and attempted to communicate with the couple inside the house. After receiving no response, tactical team members entered the house at roughly 12:30 p.m.The deceased husband and wife were identified as Thomas Masse, 60, and Michelle Masse, 59. A handgun was found beside Thomas Masse. The State Medical Examiner’s Office later declared the deaths the result of a murder-suicide.Verso Paper Corporation’s Androscoggin Mill in Jay.February – Verso announces plan to upgrade, restart No. 3 machineVerso Corporation announced in February that it intended to upgrade and reopen the No. 3 paper machine and an associated pulp line at the Androscoggin Mill, enabling the manufacture of packaging products.The No. 3 machine and its associated equipment was idled in January 2017 following a November 2016 announcement, with 190 employees laid off in early 2017. Verso announced that the machine had been shut down in July 2017, eliminating those positions. That reduction in workforce cut roughly one-third of the mill’s 560 employees, just two years after another 300 positions were eliminated following the shutdown of two other machines.State and local officials lauded the announcement, which represented the creation of approximately 120 jobs.The upgrade of the No. 3 machine and pulp line took the form of a $17 million project. Of that money, $4 million was provided by a Maine Technology Asset Fund 2.0 challenge grant administered by the Maine Technology Institute.In July, Verso announced further investment in the Androscoggin Mill, focusing on the production of release liner paper at its No. 4 machine.Then-Attorney General Janet Mills spoke to the audience prior to the march.March – Hundreds gather for March For Our Lives in FarmingtonFollowing the deaths of 17 Stoneman Douglas High School students and staff members in February, people around the country gathered on March 24 in an effort to end gun violence in classrooms.The youth-led event brought hundreds to Main Street to join in the movement. Students from elementary grades to college level were joined by teachers, principals, family members and community members for the march, followed by a line up of speakers in Meetinghouse Park. Mt. Blue High School students shared poems, songs and thoughts on the issue, calling for a change in policies.“Students should not fear school. They shouldn’t have to memorize lock down protocol. Enough is enough. We need to be heard,” student speaker Kayla Kayla LeGrand said. “Congress, the ball is in your court. And we will be voting in the midterm election.”April – Fatal shooting of Somerset County deputy sparks manhuntWhile occurring in neighboring Somerset County, the shooting death of Cpl. Eugene Cole and ensuing manhunt for suspect John Williams drew significant attention across western Maine. Williams is alleged to have shot and killed Cole in the early morning hours of April 25, then stolen his marked cruiser and driven it to a convenience store. Cole, a 13-year veteran of the Somerset County Sheriff’s Office, was the first law enforcement officer to die on duty in Maine in nearly 30 years.A manhunt of local, state and federal law enforcement officers was launched throughout the area, eventually locating Williams at a camp in Fairfield three days later. Williams, who has been charged with murder, is scheduled to be tried in 2019.May – RSU 9 budget passesVoters in the 10 towns that comprise the Regional School Unit 9 school district went to the polls in May to cast their ballots on a $35.5 million budget. They ended up supporting the budget by a vote of 1,552 in favor to 1,174 opposed.That budget, approved on May 7 at the district-wide budget meeting, represented an increase of $1.9 million over the current fiscal year or 5.68 percent. New items in the budget included teaching and support positions, staff and support for the Pathways for All Learners program and funds donated by Richard Bjorn to benefit the Foster Career & Technical Education Center.In total, not including Bjorn’s donation and some other miscellaneous funds, the budget was funded by roughly $13.3 million from local town assessments and $21 million from the state allocation, an increase of $750,000. It resulted in a 6.25 percent increase in local assessments.June – Sheriff sounds alarm after three overdoses reported in one weekThe Franklin County Sheriff’s Office responded to apparent overdoses in three towns in a single week in June, leading to Sheriff Scott Nichols issuing a warning and request for help from the community regarding fentanyl, a potent opioid blamed for overdose deaths across the country.FCSO detectives and deputies, along with local fire department and NorthStar EMS personnel, responded to New Sharon and Chesterville on June 5 and Strong on June 7 after receiving reports of drug overdoses. In every case, Nichols said, the drug NARCAN was administered to help revive all three individuals. All three cases are under investigation.“Heroin is a dangerous, illicit narcotic in and of itself,” Nichols said in a public safety announcement released in June, “but we are finding that most of these overdoses are actually as a result of the ingestion of fentanyl.”A synthesized form of heroin dating back to the 1960s, the legal, pharmaceutical version of fentanyl is prescribed by medical providers as a pain medication. The fentanyl sold illicitly for recreational use is instead manufactured in clandestine laboratories, frequently outside of the United States, and may be marketed as heroin. The drug, which is often many times more potent than street-level heroin, has been linked to roughly 60 percent of last year’s fatal overdoses in Maine.Anyone who may have information relevant to the trafficking or source of fentanyl is asked to contact the FCSO through its Facebook page or by calling (207)778-2680.July – Fatal crash kills Freeman Township manA motorcycle accident ended in a fatality on July 21 on the West Freeman Road, after the operator failed to navigate a corner and ran off the road. The motorist, 56-year-old Flint York of Freeman Township, died at the scene.The Wilton Blueberry Festival.August – Blueberry Festival brings a summertime Christmas to WiltonThe town’s iconic August festival is a consistent top story, bringing an eclectic mix of shopping, activities and its iconic parade to downtown Wilton. The festival’s roots go back to 1982, when it started as the Blueberry Church Bazaar at the First Congregational Church on Main Street. In 1989, head organizer Shannon Smith took over and turned the small, mostly locally-attended event to one of the bigger summer draws in western Maine.Event winners can be found here.Cordelia Murphy was the winner of the costume contest by unanimous decision. To the left is her mother, Sara Murphy, and behind her is Judy Smith, who organized the inaugural event.September – The Farmington Fair comes to townAnother common candidate to this list, the Farmington Fair schedule and various updates were among the articles with the highest traffic for September. The 178th annual Farmington Fair featured the traditional livestock shows and contests, pari-mutuel racing, exhibitions, midway games, rides and food, as well as new events such as a pie-eating contest, bike drawings and a costume contest that drew a single, adorable contestant.Officer Michael LymanOfficer Jesse ClementOctober – Farmington police officers recognized for saving woman’s lifeOfficer Jesse Clement and Officer Michael Lyman were given the Lifesaving Award for their actions in July.At approximately 8 a.m. on July 6, a woman was reported missing from her house in Strong. The woman, who had recently lost a family member and was depressed, had reportedly taken an unknown quantity of prescription medication. A number of agencies began searching, including the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, the Maine Warden Service, firefighters from the Strong and Farmington departments and three FPD officers: Lyman, Clement and Sgt. Edward Hastings IV.Lyman and Clement began searching the woods and fields near the missing woman’s home. After approximately two hours, they discovered her stuck in a stream, face down in the water. They immediately retrieved her, Peck said, saving her life.“Without hesitation you entered the stream and pulled her to safety,” Peck wrote in a letter of commendation for the officers. “Your prompt and alert action saved her life.”November – Election results for Franklin CountyElection results tend to draw eyeballs, particularly for a gubernatorial race. Franklin County residents chose Farmington native and Democratic candidate Janet Mills to be the state’s next governor, mirroring Mills’ success across the entire state. Franklin County voters also chose Democratic candidate Jared Golden to replace Republican candidate and incumbent Congressman Bruce Poliquin; that outcome was later confirmed statewide following implementation of the ranked choice voting system, a legal challenge and an aborted recount.Locally, residents selected now-Sen. Russell Black (R – Wilton) to serve as the county’s senator and backed a number of incumbents for house seats. Newcomers include Scott Landry (D – Farmington) and Randy Hall (R – Wilton).December – Farmington man repeatedly rams ex-girlfriend’s vehicleJoshua Norton (Photo courtesy of Franklin County Detention Center)A local man was arrested on Dec. 16 after Farmington police say he returned to the scene of a crime to once again ram a woman’s vehicle with his minivan.Joshua Norton, 39 of Farmington, has been charged with five, Class C felonies: two counts of domestic violence reckless conduct with a dangerous weapon, domestic violence stalking with prior convictions, aggravated criminal mischief and violating a protection from abuse order. He has also bee charged with misdemeanor driving to endanger and failing to stop for an officer. The charges all relate to Norton’s alleged actions near Walmart.It is alleged that Norton had been at Walmart and had a verbal confrontation with the woman, Norton’s ex-girlfriend, prior to the incident. As their vehicles left the store and proceeded to the intersection with the Wilton Road, Norton allegedly pulled up beside the woman’s vehicle, a Honda Pilot, and began ramming the Dodge minivan he was operating into its side. The woman was able to leave the intersection and called police. Norton reportedly fled the scene.Later that evening, Norton’s vehicle was located on Franklin Avenue. He reportedly ignored commands to stop and instead returned to the Walmart lot. The woman was still at the scene with officers, police say, and Norton once again tried to ram her vehicle.“The victim drove around the parking lot trying to avoid being hit by Mr. Norton,” Deputy Chief Shane Cote said in the statement, “all while the police officers were actively trying to get him to stop.”Officers described following Norton around the parking lot at least three times, while pedestrians walked through the lot and people watched from the entrance. Finally, Norton allegedly was able to ram the Honda Pilot with his minivan. At this point, he lost control of his vehicle and crashed into a snowbank. Norton immediately surrendered to police and was taken into custody without further incident.Top opinion stories (by traffic)EP Rock as Elvis1. Al Diamon – “Your vote doesn’t count” – link here2. William Gilliland – “Another bloody day” – link here3. John Frary – “Time to poke a hole in the Bill of Rights” – link hereTop art stories (by traffic)1. Local quilter’s work on display in Carrabassett Valley – link here2. RSU 9 students selected to attend All-State Music Festival – link here3. Elvis impersonation in Phillips – link hereTop happenings stories (by traffic)1. American Pickers to film in Maine – link here2. Wilton teen heads to Miss Teen International – link here3. 104-year-old honored as Farmington’s oldest resident – link hereAnne Marie Veilleux, center with flowers, was honored at Pinewood Terrace as Farmington’s oldest resident at 104.Top business stories (by traffic)1. Worthley appointed lead pharmacy technician at hospital – link here2. HVAC introductory class being offered this spring – link here3. Beaudoin welcomed as new FSB lender – link hereGraduates of the 2017 Spruce Mountain & Franklin County Adult Ed HVAC collaborative. (Photo by Mike Burd)Most commented story (-ies!)Actually a tie – 105 comments apiece – for John Frary’s “Time to poke a hole in the Bill of Rights” (see above, under Opinions) and the story on the Farmington march (see above, under March)last_img read more

Global Programs Director

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first_imgAmrit N. Bart has been named assistant dean for international affairs in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and director of the college’s Office of Global Programs.As director, Bart will coordinate international agricultural programs in teaching, research and service, with a focus on building the program’s profile and presence. “I hope to make a significant contribution toward making the global programs grow and develop here at the University of Georgia,” Bart said. “I would like to see the global programs elevated to a level of prominence where other strong universities see us as strong partners.” Bart was formerly the director of the Asian Institute of Technology in Vietnam (AIT) and a faculty member of aquaculture and aquatic resource management at AIT in Thailand. With over 15 years experience in international agriculture training, research and outreach management, Bart has built a vast network of global institutions and individuals. “Dr. Bart brings a wealth of experience to UGA,” said J. Scott Angle, dean and director of UGA CAES. “He knows best a part of the world that we intend to focus on over the next decade. His contacts, experience and understanding of Southeast Asia will be invaluable as we build programs in this area.” Bart’s international background includes managing and leading USAID-funded sustainability projects on aquatic resources and management. He has served as a Peace Corps volunteer and worked with the Consortium of International Agricultural Research Centers on projects to reduce poverty by improving the livelihoods of fishermen and fish farmers. “The mission of land grant universities fits well with my own personal view that well integrated academics and research and outreach must lead to local prosperity and thus, further the cause of society,” he said. Bart succeeds Edward T. Kanemasu who retired in February 2014 after leading the global programs office for 24 years. For more information on global programs at UGA, see the website www.global.uga.edu or contact Vicki McMaken at 706-542-1073 or [email protected]last_img read more

Beans, Bikes, and a Bald Guy

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first_img“That coffee you’re drinking? The guy who grew that got shot in the head last week.”The couple casually sipping on their just-purchased cup of joe pause, unsure of how to react to the bald man standing before them. Is he joking? Is he serious? For a moment, the four of us stand on the front porch of Bald Guy Brew with only the sound of cars idling through downtown Valle Crucis, N.C., to break the silence. The woman nervously laughs and takes another sip.“What’s in your cup matters,” he continues, patting a sack of unroasted Mexican coffee beans that has just arrived. Considering the blunt delivery of his message, the couple recovers surprisingly well and begins to ask questions to the bald guy.That bald guy is the Bald Guy of Bald Guy Brew Roasting Company. His name is Don Cox, and he’s just about as complex of an individual as the third-world coffees he roasts in his little shop in western North Carolina. An Appalachian State University alumnus, carpenter, priest, aspiring cyclist, and “grunt” of Bald Guy Brew, Cox’s diverse array of life experiences and interests can be seen in every corner of the coffee shop.Framed photographs of Rwandan refugees adorn the walls, bike jerseys hang off the handlebars of Cox’s commuter ride, and a stack of coffee sacks from around the globe sit in a chest-deep pile by the main roaster, Lucille.“She’s got a nice groove, like B.B. King’s guitar,” Cox says, nodding toward the roasting machine that’s loudly churning freshly roasted coffee beans.The machine isn’t tucked away in some back room of the coffee shop. Instead, Cox has it on display so customers can see the roasting process, from green coffee bean to delicious caffeinated beverage. Cox’s wife Shannon is a schoolteacher, so he’s well versed in the ways of education. There’s a story behind every photograph, a lesson in each empty sack of coffee, but his main platform for helping educate others on “what’s in your cup,” is his bike.“I’m not a cyclist,” Cox says. “I’ve fallen off my bike more than I’ve ever ridden it. Plus, a bald guy in spandex…bad.”Don’t let his modesty fool you. Cox has spent his fair share of hours in the saddle. After diving into the coffee growing industry during a three-year stint in Mexico, Cox was invited to work with genocide survivors in Rwanda where he came up with the Beans for Bikes initiative. In the spring of 2011, Cox hopped on a bike in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., and pedaled his way home to Boone with 100 pounds of Rwandan coffee on board. His mission? For every mile he rode, a backer would pledge $1 to the initiative to help fund the production of bikes for coffee growers in Rwanda.“It was amazing…that I made it,” Cox says laughing. “I helped raise over $5,000. I think I was younger and dumber. But, now I’m older and dumber so I’m going to do it again.”This fall, Cox plans to hop back on the bike and reverse his trip, this time pedaling to Wrightsville Beach from Boone with 100lbs of Costa Rican coffee. The goal now is to raise funds to create a research and development farm in Costa Rica. The farm will serve as an educational project to help coffee growers, which will in turn create a standard to open up the doors for market access. If you’ve ever wondered what “fair trade” really means, this is it.“We exist to empower coffee growing communities rather than exploit them,” Cox says. “Coffee has to be doing good things for us and it has to be good. So if it’s good, and it’s doing good, it’s kind of a win.”Since starting his business in 2011, Cox has made every effort to provide eco-friendly, socially responsible, artisanal coffee. From the bio-fueled, solar-powered Dodge Sprinter van where Bald Guy Brew began to the 4,500 pounds of coffee beans that have now been distributed to wholesale clients entirely by bike (3,800 of those by Cox himself), this bald guy doesn’t just talk the talk – he rides it too.“Why do I ride bikes to promote Bald Guy’s mission of doing good? It’s because if I walk carrying coffee it will take too long,” he says. “I think small businesses can make a difference without having a lot of money. You have to be who you say you are and do what you say.”It’s a lot easier said than done. From coffee shareholder politics to clogging up the injectors of his van while trying to make his own biofuel, Cox has built his business from the ground up, largely through trial and error.“I have a 9-year-old and a 12-year-old who were six and nine during that Beans for Bikes ride,” Cox says. “They saw their old man humpin’ up a mountain on a bike with a bunch of coffee trying to make a difference in the world. I just want my boys to know that there’s another way to live. We don’t have the ability to write fat checks, but I have a bike.”last_img read more

Copiague, Wyandanch Home Invasions Probed

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police are investigating a pair of armed home invasions seven miles and two hours apart over the weekend that brought the number of such cases in the past month to 11.In the first of the most recent cases, two men broke into a Pleasantview Court home in Copiague, flashed a gun, demanded money and pistol-whipped a man inside at 9:20 p.m. Friday, police said. The suspects, described only as black men, fled with cash and property, police said.Then at 11:40 p.m. Friday, three armed men kicked in the back door of a North 17th Street home in Wyandanch, stole money from the victims inside and fled the scene. The trio was only described as a group of Hispanic men.A police spokesman could not confirm initial reports that the suspects were armed with a pistol and a machete but did say there have been no arrests in either case. It was unclear if there were any injuries in the second case.The pair of Feb. 15 cases bring into the double digits the number of armed home invasions in Suffolk since Jan. 15, when there were five such incidents in a week in Mastic, North Lindenhurst, Dix Hills, Huntington and Coram. There were five arrested in the Huntington case and three arrested in the North Lindenhurt case.A sixth armed home invasion was reported in Gordon Heights on Jan. 25, two days before a 21-year-old man was gunned down by home invaders in Flanders.Three people have been arrested for the eighth armed home invasion in Halesite on Feb. 5 and another trio has been charged with the ninth home invasion in Central Islip in the early morning hours of Feb. 7.Police are continuing the investigations.last_img read more

Compliance: New CUNA checklist for privacy notice opt-outs

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first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Credit unions confused by the in-progress changes to annual privacy notice requirements have a new resource, courtesy of the Credit Union National Association (CUNA). CUNA has developed a privacy notice opt-out checklist, a comprehensive resource intended to assist credit unions until the rule is finalized.Changes to privacy notice requirements were signed into law in December 2015, following a number of years spent by CUNA asking for changes from regulators and members of Congress. CUNA was a strong supporter of the bill that was eventually included as part of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act.The list, developed by CUNA’s Senior Federal Compliance Counsel Colleen Kelly, asks credit unions about sharing of nonpublic personal information with third parties and if those third parties are “affiliates” of the credit union. The list lays out the requirements for financial institutions that disclose nonpublic personal information with nonaffiliated third parties.Those institutions are required to:Provide an initial notice to the member;last_img read more

Nussle LinkedIn editorial applauds credit unions for protecting seniors

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first_img 14SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr CUNA President/CEO Jim Nussle applauded credit unions for their efforts in serving seniors in an editorial published on LinkedIn Thursday.June 15 has been declared World Elder Abuse Awareness Day by the International Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the World Health Organization at the United Nations since 2006.“It is unfortunate that we need such a day but inspiring that there are so many willing to advocate with, and on behalf of seniors who may vulnerable to abuse,” Nussle wrote. “America’s credit unions are dedicated to meeting the financial needs of all consumers, and serving the seniors in their communities is an important part of their mission.”Nussle noted that advocates from around world are gathering today in Washington, D.C. for the third Global Summit on World Elder Abuse Awareness Day.“At today’s summit, staff from North Carolina’s State Employees Credit Union will be on the agenda to discuss financial abuse issues plaguing older adults and the legislation that could address the issues affecting our seniors,” Nussle wrote. “I applaud State Employees Credit Union for dedicating their time to advocate on this important matter.” continue reading »last_img read more