Celebrating 30 years of ‘sweet preaching’ in the Episcopal Church

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first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 1, 2017 Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Melanie Barbarito says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY June 2, 2017 at 11:42 am As one of the those who was privileged to participate, I am grateful to all of those who are working to strengthen the preaching of the Good News in the Episcopal Church. Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Presiding Bishop Michael Curry is the honorary chairman of the Episcopal Preaching Foundation, which A. Gary Shilling started 30 years ago to improve preaching in the Episcopal Church. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Richmond, Virginia] A. Gary Shilling likes to joke that he began the Episcopal Preaching Foundation after he realized he was reading the back pages of the Book of Common Prayer or even balancing his checkbook during a sermon.That was more than 30 years ago and Shilling decided to do something about it.Having already founded an investment advisory firm in Springfield, New Jersey, Shilling created, and largely funded, the Episcopal Preaching Foundation. By this year, close to 5,000 Episcopal Church preachers will have been strengthened by the foundation’s work. On May 30, foundation supporters gathered to celebrate that achievement and its instigator.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry preached during Eucharist at All Saints Episcopal Church in suburban Richmond, Virginia. He later joined in the tributes during dinner at the nearby Diocese of Virginia’s Roslyn Retreat Center. The celebration took place during the foundation’s May 28-June 2 Preaching Excellence Program for seminarians and recent graduates, who attended the celebration.From the beginning, Shilling said, he was convinced that excellent preaching is key to engaging all Episcopalians, especially those for whom a sermon during worship is their main point of contact, with the Church. Good preachers, he reasoned, were rewarded, so he decided to connect with preachers who were early in their lives in the pulpit. The foundation’s mission is based on the premise that strong and vibrant preaching will attract congregants and grow the Episcopal Church.During his sermon and in his dinner remarks, Curry, a 1991 Preaching Excellence Program alum, praised Shilling’s instincts. He also argued that preaching in today’s world was not just about growing a church but, rather, growing hope in a weary and troubled world that has a skewed idea of Christianity.Christians often look like anything but the compassionate, life-giving and liberating Jesus of the Bible, he said.“We need some witnesses to a way of being Christian that actually looks something like Jesus of Nazareth,” Curry said. “The Jesus of Nazareth who said, ‘the spirit of the Lord is upon me because he has anointed me to preach good news to the poor’” and who preached compassion and love, even for one’s enemies.“My brothers and sisters who would preach the word, we need you in your preaching to point us to that Jesus and then for all of us to go out into this world as the Jesus Movement to bear witness to him,” Curry said to an applauding congregation. “That is a church that matters and that is a church that will have a future.”Episcopal Preaching Foundation founder A. Gary Shilling may be an economist, financial analyst and commentator, but his avocation is beekeeping. His bees produced the wax that he used to make the candles that lit the dinner tables during the May 30 celebration of the foundation’s 30th anniversary. Each dinner attendee received a bottle of Shilling Apiaries honey commemorating “30 years of sweet preaching.” Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceLater at the dinner, the presiding bishop spoke directly to Shilling, calling him “wise, gentle and courageous.”Curry, who recently agreed to serve as the foundation’s honorary chair, compared Shilling to Mary. Shilling said yes to “the calling of the Holy Spirit,” he said.“Yes, so that we would raise up new generations of preachers; yes, so that they would be trained and equipped,” the presiding bishop continued, adding that Shilling’s “yes” has also supported seminaries in their effort to train preachers and supported new graduates who are sent out to preach good news.The Very Rev. Andrew McGowan, dean and president of Berkeley Divinity School, praised Shilling for epitomizing the ministry of the laity, as described in the back pages of the Book of Common Prayer (on page 855, specifically). The catechism says that ministry is to “represent Christ and his Church; to bear witness to him wherever they may be; and, according to the gifts given them, to carry on Christ’s work of reconciliation in the world; and to take their place in the life, worship, and governance of the Church.”Shilling, who attends Christ Church in Short Hills, New Jersey, has also served at the local, diocesan and churchwide level.An economist by training and vocation, Shilling told the dinner guests that the success of the foundation rested on “an uptrend” in interest in preaching, and on a “lot of luck.”He said he decided early on that the organization should not work with experienced preachers who were already being recognized for their work but with new preachers as they embarked on their careers and as they grew into their ministry.Episcopal Preaching Foundation founder A. Gary Shilling, left, and Diocese of Virginia Bishop Shannon S. Johnston listen as Presiding Bishop Michael Curry answers a question during a May 30 news conference at Roslyn Conference Center in suburban Richmond, Virginia. The small news conference marked the start of the day’s celebration of the foundation’s 30th anniversary. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServicePreaching, Virginia Bishop Shannon S. Johnston said during a press conference earlier in the day, good preaching is “absolutely critical” to a faith community. “There is no better organization to send people to who want to study the craft and the art and the faithfulness of a good sermon,” he said of the preaching foundation and its programs.The foundation’s centerpiece is its annual Preaching Excellence Program, which offers seminarians and recent graduates an immersion experience in the art and practice of preaching. PEP gathers seminarians, homiletics professors and rectors for a week of lectures, worship, workshops and small groups in which the students preach sermons for discussion and feedback.The tuition-free program began in 1988. More than 1,500 Episcopal clergy have participated in the program. Participants are nominated by their seminaries.Wesley Morris, a seminarian from the Diocese of North Carolina who attends Union Seminary in New York, gets a snapshot with Presiding Bishop Michael Curry after a May 30 Eucharist at All Saints Episcopal Church in suburban Richmond, Virginia, commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Episcopal Preaching Foundation. Morris is one of 39 current and just-graduated seminarians attending the foundation’s annual Preaching Excellence Program May 28-June 2 at the nearby Roslyn Conference Center. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceBeginning in 2014, thanks to a generous grant from the Robertson Foundation, “PEP II” has gathered recently ordained priests for a similar experience. This year’s session runs June 13-16 at Drew University, in Madison, New Jersey.Since 2012, the foundation has also helped thousands of priests, deacons and lay preachers improve their skills through other conferences at the diocesan, national and international level.This year the Episcopal Preaching Foundation partnered with the John Templeton Foundation to integrate studies on forgiveness into the practice of preaching. Forgiveness will be the focus at the Preaching Excellence Program and PEP II.Everett Worthington, a professor of psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University and a clinical psychologist, will lead preachers through his work on forgiveness. He told Episcopal News Service that he plans to discuss how preachers and pastors can incorporate “forgiveness education” into their preaching and into the lives of their congregations.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is senior editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments are closed. Celebrating 30 years of ‘sweet preaching’ in the Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop tells Episcopal Preaching Foundation supporters that preachers must bring hope to the world Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments (1) Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more

For trans people, ‘there should not be for-profit detention centers’

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first_imgJupiter Peraza made these slightly edited remarks at an April 1 webinar, “Trans Day of Visibility,” organized by the LGBTQ+ caucus of Workers World Party. Peraza is an undocumented trans woman activist, DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) recipient, program associate for the Transgender District in San Francisco and coordinator of the District’s Housing Opportunities for Trans Tenants. Her work focuses on immigrant rights and voter mobilization.  Peraza’s remarks responded to questions of treatment for transgender people inside prisons and detention centers and whether our incarcerated transgender siblings have rights to specialized medical care or hormone treatment. Go to youtu.be/iBNkGU9NO4M to view the entire webinar. Jupiter PerazaOur trans siblings do not have adequate care in detention facilities. A case that I want to talk about is connected to how the U.S. government had responsibility in overthrowing the progressive government in Honduras. Roxsana Hernandez was a 33-year-old transgender woman from Honduras, who was fleeing her home country and coming to the United States to seek asylum after being displaced and after being raped by gangs in her country. She fled her country to be able to seek protection and safety in the United States in 2019. This was during the Trump administration which limited and made it hard for trans people to seek and receive asylum productions. A little over two weeks after she arrived in the U.S. seeking safety, she died in ICE [Immigration and Customs Enforcement] custody after she was transferred from one facility to the next within a timespan of as little as six hours. To ICE’s standards, individuals who are HIV positive must receive a 30-day supply of medication before being transferred. And there is no evidence that Roxana received that medication, which led to her death. And there was absolutely no record of this, and ICE still has not faced any repercussions. So this answers your question as to how trans people are not being taken care of in detention facilities. For-profit detention centersWhen you think of detention centers, you think of cisgender immigrants, and that is something that comes up front. And transgender people very often go ignored when it comes to these facilities. Roxsana was held at a facility that was run by CoreCivic. It’s a for-profit, private prison [corporation] that runs several detention centers along the border, very similar to GEO Group. I had the pleasure and the honor to speak outside of 111 Taylor in San Francisco, where the Compton Cafeteria Riots happened in the summer of 1966. GEO Group runs a private prison in that same building. We were there to denounce GEO Group being in that district, which is historically a trans and gender-nonconforming neighborhood that holds so much history that dates way back to the late 1800s and early 1900s. I was very glad to be there because getting GEO Group out is as much of an immigrant issue as it is a trans issue as it is a Black issue. And this comes after the state of California passed Assembly Bill 32, which bans private prisons from operating in the state of California. Even with the Biden administration, there should not be for-profit detention centers. And this also goes along the similar lines of we need to defund ICE.  People are under this perception that ICE takes care of our national security, which is absolutely not true. ICE was created after 9/11, after this whole scare of who is a threat to national security. Just to briefly touch on how trans people are barred from receiving medical care and hormone treatment. Even though I am a DACA recipient, I still fear that I might get deported one day, that I might get detained by ICE and sent to a detention center where I will not have access to health care and where I will be put in a facility with cisgender men, where I do not belong. And these are just the realities that transgender people face, even transgender people who are U.S. citizens. And as to the realities and the fears that undocumented transgender people face like myself, where we fear not only not having access to medical care or hormones, were we to be detained in detention centers, but also the fact that if we do get deported, having access to hormones and medical care in a strange country is also incredibly scary. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Arlington Heights football coach helps guide young college recruits

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first_imgMitchell Stehlyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/mitchell-stehly/ Previous articleJunior League of Fort Worth hosts annual holiday gift marketNext articlePetting zoo spreads joy on campus Mitchell Stehly RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Facebook + posts Linkedin Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Twitter Facebook Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday Mitchell Stehlyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/mitchell-stehly/ TCU students finish intramural season, enjoy indoor soccer ReddIt The109: Development plan revealed for Berry Street ReddIt Mitchell Stehly Twitter Mitchell Stehlyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/mitchell-stehly/ printAs college coaches begin to scout the next wave of talent, Arlington Heights head football coach Philip Young is helping his players adapt to the constantly changing world of college recruitmentYoung said the recruiting process has changed drastically due to the rise of social media and video services.“20 years ago there was not as much video evaluation of kids,” Young said. “Nowadays, every kid and every coach everywhere has Hudl accounts.”[View the story “Recruits Tweet at Coaches ” on Storify]Before Hudl accounts, Young said he was inundated with requests for copies of game footage by college coaches in what became “nearly a full time job.”Young said there are currently three committed football players on the Arlington Heights football team. Deion Hair-Griffin is committed to North Texas, Patrick Jones is committed to SMU and Corbin James is committed to Northwestern State.Hair-Griffin and Jones both own twitter accounts that have a link to their Hudl accounts in their bios.Their Hudl accounts showcase highlights in packages from full season and individual games.Jones said his Hudl and twitter accounts played a significant role in his recruitment.“He has us make [the Hudl accounts]. We ask a coach to revise it and the player and coach will go over it together,” Jones said.Jones advises other recruits to do the same.“I tell a lot of players from my team and friends to put your Hudl account in your bio of every social media network that you have. Especially with twitter,” Jones said. “Actually what got me as many scholarships as I did is I would go on twitter and look for different college coaches that recruit this area.”Hair-Griffin held offers from SMU, Army West Point and Louisiana-Monroe before electing to verbally commit to North Texas, according to Scout.com. He accumulated 1,895 yards passing, 1,365 yards rushing and 48 total touchdowns.“If you do your job to the best of your ability then you put yourself in position to get a scholarship,” Hair-Griffin wrote. “Coach Young has really helped me through the whole process by just encouraging me through the whole period.”Young, a former recruiting coordinator, said that despite the changes in recruiting over the years, high school football remains the purest form of recruiting.“Every kid that gets recruited – that coach has to come sit in front of me at my desk,” Young said.Young said that unlike other sports in which club and summer teams take precedent, high school football remains at the forefront in college recruiting.“There is not club season in football. You can’t go to a club coach and get in with a kid,” Young said. “College coaches and high school coaches have to have a relationship in recruiting.”He said the relationship between college coaches and high school coaches is critical in finding the right fit for high school recruits.“We are so involved in their lives,” he said. “They trust what we say.”Young said the education of both recruits and their parents also play a large role in determining the success of the athlete’s recruiting process. He warns students and parents about common misconceptions like the false assumption that division 3 schools offer scholarships.“We try to steer kids away from – there are so many division three schools that kids say they sign with – well you can’t sign with division three schools because they don’t offer athletic scholarships- they make it sound like they do,” Young said.Before the start of each year, Young meets with the junior and senior football players’ parents to discuss the recruiting process.Jones said Young advised him to go where he feels most comfortable.“Don’t go somewhere you like the facilities but it doesn’t feel like somewhere you want to spend the next four years of your career,” Jones said.Young reminds parents of past players who signed with a school on national signing day just for the thrill of signing with a university without considering important factors like finances, playing time and the degree.“Well in a semester they’re back home,” Young said of those players.Young said the advice he gives parents often comes as a shock.“I say ‘listen if you want your kid to get his school paid for have him get a job or don’t play sports.’ “What? [parents say].” I say ‘number one if you want to work so hard to get his school paid for he can work about the same amount and it will be a lot less heartache. It is hard work to be a college athlete under scholarship,’” Young said.Jones said he takes Young’s advice to heart.“Coach Young has always gave great advice,” he said. “I look up to him just like a father.”Staying close to home: Jones (red) and Hair-Griffin (green) will remain close to Arlington Heights (blue). Paschal catcher commits to TCU Mitchell Stehlyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/mitchell-stehly/ Development plan revealed for Berry/University, some express oppositionlast_img read more

Paschal senior commits to play baseball at TCU

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first_imgTIffany Pittmanhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tiffany-pittman/ Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday Linkedin Facebook McLean 6th brings “A Buck and A Bucket” to support a student’s family TIffany Pittmanhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tiffany-pittman/ Twitter Previous articleBoard of Trustees raises tuition, discusses development and constructionNext articleIMAGE Sneak Peek: Best pumpkin patches in Fort Worth TIffany Pittman RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Ballroom dancing popular amongst elementary school students print Another Panther has committed to play baseball for the Horned Frogs. Andrew Medford, a Fort Worth native, is a senior at R. L. Paschal High School and will play at his first choice school, TCU, beginning in the 2017 season. The 2016 season will be Medford’s third on varsity for the Panthers, said Head Baseball Coach Darrell Preston. Medford catches and pitches for the Panthers. “He’s one of the best catchers that I’ve seen at this age, at this level,” Preston said. “Being the catcher is kind of a leadership role in itself because you kind of control you know the whole game, you know the pace of the game,” Preston said. Medford will be joining a team that has gone to the College World Series for the past two seasons (2014 and 2015). He is excited to be a part of the team and knows it will be hard work, he said. Preston said Medford is the three-hole hitter which is usually for one of the best hitters on the team. Compared to TCU players from the 2015 season, Medford’s batting average was higher than the top five players for the Horned Frogs.Medford v. TCU Batting AverageCreate your own infographics “He’s put so much time and energy into developing his skills in the game and it’s paying off. All he’s wanted to do is go to the next level and play in college,” Preston said. He referred to Medford as a “field rat” because he is found on the field often working on his craft. Medford has played baseball since he was young and is looking forward to pursuing his passion, he said. He has only played baseball and loves it mostly for the competition, he said. Medford will be a great addition to the TCU team because of his dedication to the sport and his ability to play two positions, Preston said. The Panthers season begins early next year where you can see Medford in action before joining the Frogs. Medford signed his Letter of Intent on November 11, 2015. Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature TIffany Pittmanhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tiffany-pittman/ Linkedin ReddIt Education majors give glimpse of college to international students Facebook TIffany Pittman TIffany Pittmanhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tiffany-pittman/ ReddIt McLean 6th brings “A Buck and A Bucket” to support a student’s family + posts Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Twitterlast_img read more

Delhi HC Denies Bail To Accused Who Wanted To Support His Family As Father Is Quarantined Due To COVID19 [Read Order]

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first_imgNews UpdatesDelhi HC Denies Bail To Accused Who Wanted To Support His Family As Father Is Quarantined Due To COVID19 [Read Order] Karan Tripathi11 April 2020 8:46 PMShare This – xDelhi High Court has denied interim bail to a person who wanted to take care of his family in Bijnor as his father has been quarantined due to COVID19 and can’t support the family. While denying the bail, the Single Bench of Justice Suresh Kumar Kait reasoned that the Petitioner’s father has already completed 7 days in quarantine and he is left with only 7 more days for the quarantine…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginDelhi High Court has denied interim bail to a person who wanted to take care of his family in Bijnor as his father has been quarantined due to COVID19 and can’t support the family. While denying the bail, the Single Bench of Justice Suresh Kumar Kait reasoned that the Petitioner’s father has already completed 7 days in quarantine and he is left with only 7 more days for the quarantine period to be completed. Thereafter, there’s a possibility of the situation improving. The court also noted that when the whole nation is under lockdown and his commute from Delhi to Bijnor will be difficult to arrange. In the plea for interim bail, the Petitioner had submitted that his parents are senior citizens and there’s also a dependent daughter in the family. Moreover, as his father is suspected to be infected with COVID19, he has been quarantined and is unable to support the family. The Petitioner informed the court that he wishes to go back and run his family’s fruit vending business to support their needs until his father retains his health. Appearing for the state, Additional Public Prosecutor Kusum Bhalla informed the court that a visit was conducted at the native place of Petitioner and it was found that his father was suffering from critical respiratory and acute asthmatic disease which is causing congestion in breathing and he was breathing through oxygen cylinder and had been provided a prescription letter from the local doctor of village. While analysing the facts, the court observed that if Petitioner is released on interim bail, he would not be able to meet his father or take care of him as he is a suspected patient of COVID-19. The court further observed that the residence of Petitioner’s patents is around 180 km away from Delhi and if he is directed to be released on interim bail, it will be difficult for the State to make special arrangements for his travel from Delhi to Bijnor. In light of the same, the court denied interim bail to the Petitioner by noting that there’s no urgency to grant the same.Click Here To Download Order[Read Order] Next Storylast_img read more

Donegal Councillor pushes for development of islands

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first_img WhatsApp Twitter Google+ Pinterest Twitter Donegal Councillor pushes for development of islands Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Pinterest Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Facebook Google+center_img A Donegal Councillor is urging Island Minister Heather Humphreys to visit Donegal for discussions on how best to develop the islands in a way that meets the aspirations of the islanders.Donegal County Council’s Island’s Committee was told this week that both Minister Humphreys and Gaeltacht Minister Catherine Martin have a role in ensuring that those who want to live and work on all of Donegal’s islands can do so.Cllr Michael Cholm Mac Giolla Easbuig says the last tranche of island funding saw Donegal’s islands lose out, but he’s confident that will change soon:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/michweds1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Previous articleOne further death and 307 more cases of Covid-19Next articleGovernment’s new Brexit readiness action plan to be published later News Highland By News Highland – September 9, 2020 WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook DL Debate – 24/05/21 AudioHomepage BannerNewslast_img read more

Man killed in hit-and-run pushed daughter out of the way, family says

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first_imgGlendale Police Department(GLENDALE, Ariz.) — Father killed while saving daughter in hit-and-runA man was killed when he was struck by a hit-and-run driver in Glendale, Arizona, on Saturday night, after pushing his teenage daughter out of the way of the vehicle.Glendale Police DepartmentPolice in Arizona are searching for a vehicle involved in a hit-and-run that killed one man, whose family said he died protecting his daughter.Carlos Chavez Aguirre was identified by police as the man who died on Jan. 11 in Glendale, according to a press release from the city’s police department.Aguirre and a juvenile girl, who the family identified as his daughter, were crossing the road near 49th Avenue and Glendale Avenue around 7:15 p.m. when they were struck by a pickup truck, police said.Both were transported to a local hospital, where Aguirre, 39, died. The girl’s injuries were not life threatening, police said.Family members said that is thanks to Aguirre.“He just pushed her without even saying anything, because she didn’t know what happened,” Claudia Chavez Aguirre, his sister, told ABC Phoenix affiliate KNXV.Police are now looking for the vehicle that left the scene. It is described as a 2003 to 2006 Chevrolet Silverado single cab pickup with a custom dark brown paint color, tinted windows and over-sized wheels.The vehicle continued on and eventually turned from northbound 51st Avenue to eastbound Orangewood Avenue, according to police.Anyone with information is asked to contact Silent Witness at 480-WITNESS or the Glendale Police Department at 623-930-3000.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

AVHRR channel-3 noise and methods for its removal

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first_imgData from the 37 μm channel of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) are contaminated by interference which appears in the images as a herring-bone pattern. This interference has been present, to a greater or lesser extent, in the data from all six of the instruments which have flown to date. A measure of the quality of the imagery, estimated from the NOAA-7 and NOAA-9 instruments’ calibration data, is used to gain an idea of their progressive deterioration over each satellite’s lifetime. The spectral properties of the Fourier transform of the data are examined and used to attenuate the unwanted components of the signal to an acceptable level. Two simple restoration algorithms are applied to a particularly severely contaminated NOAA-7 image and the resulting images presented.last_img read more

Building a reputation

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first_imgThink of the one-man band and if you’re like me you’ll think of Dick van Dyke’s Bert in Mary Poppins, stamping and flapping his way around the streets of London. Chances are youwon’t think of Thomas Truax. But you should. Having just played atGlastonbury this year for four nights in a row in the Lost VaguenessChapel, the eerily voiced troubadour hit Oxford on Tuesday and onWednesday night was featured on Radio One in a one-man band special.And this one-man band is special. “I was just fed up of working withlive drummers” he drawls, “it kind of came about organically”. Truax decided that as asubstitute for unreliable bandmates and to fulfil his musical needs,he’d design and construct his own instruments. And these are no normalinstruments, but rather the Cadillac Beatspinner Wheel, the Hornicator,the Backbeater and his latest addition, Sister Spinster.“She’s retired actually”, he says lovingly of the Cadillac BeatspinnerWheel, a “Flintstones-era drum machine” whose primary feature is asmall motorised bicycle wheel that rotates, clacking, clanking andchiming its way past various musicaladornments on its frame. In fact she’s been usurped, her throne takenby Sister Spinster, a similar but smaller contraption. “I made SisterSpinster mainly because she can fit on an aeroplane,” Truax explains,although it’s hard to imagine the faces of airport security staff backhome at JFK Airport in New York, especially when Truax’ luggage alsocontains the Hornicator, a modifiedgramophone horn with strings and microphones that twang and sqeak withvarious other-worldly noises, and the Backbeater, a multi-prongedbackpack that flaps and snaps in rhythm. I ask Truax if theseprehistoric solutions to the one-man act problem are a reaction againstthe digital and synthesised age. “I haven’t made it a rule that I’llnever do something with a laptop,” he replies, “but it can be anunsatisfying live experience to see somebody bending over theircomputer. I try to think of what would interest me if I were in theaudience”. And it works. In the endless parade of sharp-suited,sharp-riffed and synthesised bands that plague modern music, jaws dropwhen anything as original as Thomas Truax strolls up on stage. “I liketo see where the sounds are coming from,” he says, and withoutrealising it, the audience find that they do too.But this is no straight novelty act either. This isn’t a mandesperately crying “Look at me, I’m wacky”. There’s music here too.Often rich in lyrics, Truax’ sound ranges from “dark, romanticlullabies to lively rock melodramas” and he is seen as part of the NewYork based ‘antifolk’ movement that prizes honesty, integrity andoriginality above everything else. “Personally, I try to steer awayfrom any specific labels,” he emphasises, “but the antifolk scene doesn’t really define a particular sound or even a particular approach”. Truax’ ghostly and mysterious tales hook the ear with theirmelody and the mind with their words, calling for references to CaptainBeefheart’s originality coupled with Tom Waits’ narrative abilities.But Truax’ creative drive isn’t limited to music. For several years hewas a stop-motion animator for MTV’s ‘Celebrity Deathmatch’ and hisdedicated fanbase is kept up to date through the Wowtown News, asporadic e-mail newsletter detailing the latest happenings in Truax’own fictional world, Wowtown. “I was brought up in Denver,” heexplains, “and it’s known as ‘Cow Town’. So Wowtown was my ideal placeto escape from the Cow Town”. In fact, the success of these stories alone has ledto requests from London’s Resonance FM for Truax to do an hour-longshow based upon them. “They wanted me to do it off the top of my head,”he says, “but I kind of have to be in the right mood for that, so Irecorded some stories with sound-effects and music”.With a smile he adds, “I’m one of those people who just bites off more than they can chew”.Nevertheless, things seem to be going from strength to strength forTruax. “The crowds keep building each time I go to a town,” he statesmatter-of-factly and he’s extremely modest about a recent NME articlebranding him as achieving “musical godhood”. Certainly, the interest iskindled by the unique gadgets and contraptions surrounding him onstage, but it’s the songs that charm you and regardless of whatevergimmicks surround them, a good song never loses its novelty.ARCHIVE: 2nd week MT 2005last_img read more

Words of the Year 2009 announced by OUP

ojkronpah

first_imgStaycation, Tweetup and Jeggings are some of the Words of the Year 2009, according to a list commissioned by the Oxford University Press.The list was compiled by the dictionary expert Susie Dent, who scanned the Oxford English Corpus, a two billion word database.Tweetup, a meeting organised through Twitter; Hashtag, a hash sign added to a word that enables Twitter users to search for Tweets; and Paywall, a way of blocking access to a part of the website, were some of the words derived from new technologies.On the list there is also an array of business-related words. The recently fashionable minute mentoring, where professionals are advised by mentors in a speed-dating form, was on the list as well as freemium – a business model in which basic services are free, but users pay for extra features.In November, the Oxford American Dictionary chose Unfriend as its Word of the Year 2009.last_img read more