Governor Wolf Tours Wood-Mode in Snyder County to Highlight Job Training

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first_img Education,  Jobs That Pay,  Press Release,  Workforce Development Kreamer, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today visited Wood-Mode, Snyder County’s largest employer, to highlight job training at Pennsylvania manufacturers. He joined company and local leaders to tour the nation’s leading manufacturer of custom cabinets.“Having built a similar business, I understand that companies want to hire skilled workers in order to expand and grow, and new businesses will only come to a state that invests in training talented people,” said Governor Wolf. “This tour of Wood-Mode’s state-of-the-art facility is another reminder of the importance of workforce training, whether those workers live in rural communities or our biggest cities.”Wood-Mode, which celebrated its 75th anniversary last year, has a workforce that includes three generations of highly skilled on-site craftsmen who perform the majority of the company’s cabinetry-making process by hand in combination with advanced technology and automation.To help employees gain new skills, the company participates in the state’s WEDnetPA program, which enables companies to provide job training through a network of 27 universities, colleges and partner experts. More than 50 Wood-Mode employees have gained training through WEDnetPA at Penn State University’s Innovative Manufacturing Center and other partner institutions. The training included lean manufacturing, A3 thinking and value stream mapping, standard work and root cause analysis, and project management.“For 75 years, we have maintained success by carefully balancing time-honored craftsmanship while embracing evolving products and technologies,” said Robert Gronlund, a second-generation family owner. “From six employees in 1942 to more than 1,000 employees throughout our 1.3 million square foot facility, our commitment to training and development is vital to our success as we pass skills and techniques from one generation to the next.”Governor Wolf has made job training a priority in Pennsylvania and is expanding apprenticeship and job programs so workers and students get the hands-on experience they need for good-paying jobs and to create the talented workforce that businesses need now and in the future.Under Governor Wolf, Pennsylvania ranks near the top of states for apprenticeships and the Department of Labor and Industry is working closely with businesses and schools to expand those opportunities. Today, Pennsylvania has 750 apprenticeship programs and 15,000 apprentices, which is creating a pipeline of ready-to-work talent.The Wolf administration has also increased the number of students in career and technical programs by 42 percent, and the state is a national leader in the high-growth fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education.Pennsylvania is fourth in the number of STEM graduates and is in the top 10 of states for technology and innovation and employment in STEM jobs. The governor is committed to boosting the number of students in STEM majors at state-supported post-secondary institutions to 10,000 by the year 2020 and making sure every student has access to a robust computer science curriculum. Governor Wolf Tours Wood-Mode in Snyder County to Highlight Job Training January 04, 2018center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Little Eagles Wrestling season begins Feb. 9

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first_imgELLSWORTH — Peewee wrestling season is almost under way.Starting Feb. 9, Little Eagles Wrestling Club practices will be held Tuesdays and Fridays from 4:30 to 6 p.m. at the Ellsworth Elementary-Middle School.Two new coaches have joined the program: Logan Walsh, owner of Wrestlers Way in Ellsworth, and last year’s Ellsworth High School 152-pound state champion, Connor Petros.Michelle Hamby, president of the Little Eagles Wrestling Club, said the program is open to children ages pre-kindergarten to eighth grade from all communities, not just Ellsworth.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder text“Everybody is invited to experience a practice,” Hamby said. “Come check it out, and see what you think.”There is an optional registration fee of $25 per wrestler. Singlets as well as tournament and travel expenses are paid for by the program.“The whole purpose of this program is to teach kids the fundamentals,” Hamby said. “Our tournament will fund us for most of the year.”Ellsworth High School will host the fourth annual Little Eagles Wrestling Tournament on Saturday, March 5. High school and University of Maine-Orono wrestlers will help run the event.The Little Eagles are also scheduled to attend six other optional tournaments throughout the season.For more information, like the “Ellsworth Little Eagles Wrestling” Facebook page, or contact Hamby at [email protected] or call/text 812-1045.Little Eagles Wrestling Tournament Ellsworth High School will host the fourth annual Little Eagles Wrestling Tournament on Saturday, March 5. The event will be conducted in a round-robin format with staggered weigh-in and wrestling times.Tournament cost per wrestler is $15 pre-registration or $20 at the door. Admission is $4 for adults, $2 per student and $10 per family.For wrestlers ages pre-kindergarten to fourth grade, weigh-ins begin at 8:30 a.m., and competition starts at 9:30. For wrestlers in fifth-eighth grade, weigh-ins begin at 11:30 a.m., and competition starts at 12:30 p.m. Weight classes will be determined at weigh-ins.Each division will wrestle until finished, and then go to the auditorium for awards. Trophies will be awarded to all champions, and medals will be given to second-, third- and fourth-place finishers.All-day concessions will be served, including breakfast sandwiches, coffee, muffins and fruit in the morning and chili, pizza, subs, hot dogs and more the rest of the day.A Chinese auction and 50/50 raffles will also take place throughout the tournament. All proceeds will benefit the program.To pre-register, email wrestler information (name, age, grade, experience and estimated weight) to [email protected]last_img read more

No.8 Georgia left seeing red

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first_img West Virginia (11-1) stunned all those red-clad fans at the Georgia Dome by jumping to a 28-0 lead by the opening minute of the second quarter. The Bulldogs (10-3) rallied, twice closing within a field goal in the second half, but they couldn’t finish one of the greatest comebacks in bowl history. “I think we took to heart some of the criticism of our league and the fact that no one was predicting us to win,” West Virginia coach Rich Rodriguez said. “Basically, we were playing in their home environment, their home state.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson Give most of the credit to Slaton, who wasn’t even the Mountaineers’ best freshman runner in fall camp and didn’t crack the starting lineup until the sixth game of the season. Georgia certainly had no answer for the speedy back, who squirted through big holes and left defenders such as All-American safety Greg Blue in the dust on a pair of 52-yard touchdown runs. Slaton eclipsed the previous Sugar Bowl rushing record, a 202-yard performance by Pitt’s Tony Dorsett in a national championship-clinching victory over Georgia in 1977. “It was just our speed,” Slaton said. “They couldn’t match up with us.” The Mountaineers saved their biggest surprise for the end. Georgia was poised to get the ball back when West Virginia dropped back to punt on fourth-and-6 at the Bulldogs 48. Phil Brady hauled in the long snap but took off running, gaining 10 yards on the fake and a game-clinching first down. ATLANTA – Enough with those jokes about the Big East. West Virginia clearly deserved its place in the Bowl Championship Series. Steve Slaton rushed for a record 204 yards and three touchdowns to lead the No. 11 Mountaineers to a 38-35 victory over eighth-ranked Georgia, which couldn’t take advantage of the home-field edge Monday night in the first Sugar Bowl played outside of New Orleans. center_img “We were definitely playing for a return,” Georgia coach Mark Richt said. “We didn’t think they would do that. Give them a lot of credit. It takes a lot of nerve to do that.” The last of Slaton’s touchdowns gave the Mountaineers a seemingly comfortable 38-28 lead with 8? minutes to go. D.J. Shockley brought Georgia back with his third touchdown pass, a 34-yarder to Bryan McClendon with 5:33 left, but never got his hands on the ball again. The teams combined for 1,003 yards, much of it coming in a wild first half that ended with the Mountaineers holding a 31-21 lead. “West Virginia did a heck of a job jumping on us,” Richt said. “The only consolation is we didn’t lay down and die.” The 72nd Sugar Bowl was shifted to Atlanta after Hurricane Katrina slammed into New Orleans, flooding the Big Easy and leaving the Superdome in no shape to host a Pop Warner game, much less a major bowl. While poignant, the Sugar was the least heralded of the BCS bowls, a distant fourth to the Fiesta matchup between Notre Dame and Ohio State, the Joe Paterno-vs.-Bobby Bowden showdown at the Orange and, of course, the national championship game between No. 1 USC and No. 2 Texas at the Rose Bowl. But the Fiesta a 34-20 romp for Ohio State didn’t come close on the excitement meter. And both the Orange and Rose will be hard-pressed to produce a game this thrilling. West Virginia also did its part to stymie criticism of the Big East. OK, so the league isn’t as strong since Miami and Virginia Tech bolted to the Atlantic Coast Conference, but the Mountaineers proved they’re one of the best teams in the country. They certainly came out with a chip on their shoulder, facing the champion of the powerful Southeastern Conference just 75 miles from its Athens campus. West Virginia, which had lost 11 of its last 12 bowl games, was up 28-0 by the opening minute of the second quarter, with Slaton and Darius Reynaud scoring two touchdowns apiece. Slaton showed his speed on the first of his 52-yard runs, which capped West Virginia’s opening possession. His other first-half score came on an 18-yard burst through a tiny hole, the freshman prancing across the goal line in front of Blue. Reynaud caught a 3-yard pass from Pat White, then caught the Bulldogs off guard on a 13-yard reverse that left all but a couple of defenders running the wrong way. But Georgia didn’t fold. Kregg Lumpkin got the Bulldogs on the scoreboard with a 34-yard touchdown run, sparking a little life in the mostly Georgia crowd. They were roaring by the time the teams trotted to the locker room, having cut the deficit to a more manageable 10 points. Thomas Brown had a 52-yard touchdown run for the Bulldogs, getting loose after appearing stuffed at the line by the Mountaineers. West Virginia kept the big plays rolling when fullback Owen Schmitt, a transfer from Division III Wisconsin-River Falls, rumbled for 54 yards on a third-and-1 play. But the Georgia defense finally arrived, stuffing Slaton for a 3-yard loss on another short-yardage play at the 7 and forcing the Mountaineers to settle for Pat McAfee’s 27-yard field goal. Georgia reclaimed the momentum before halftime with an 11-play, 80-yard drive. The Bulldogs converted on fourth-and-1 at their own 42, then Shockley bailed them out on third-and-10 by scrambling away from pressure and delivering a 32-yard pass to Mario Raley. Shockley followed with a 15-yard run, then connected with Leonard Pope on a 4-yard touchdown pass with 58 seconds left in the wild half. With 62 points by halftime, the teams set both Sugar Bowl and BCS records for one half. Running up and down the field with little resistance, Georgia piled up 311 yards and West Virginia had 200 of its 294 yards on the ground. The only thing separating the teams was turnovers. Shockley and Danny Ware both fumbled the ball away, and the Mountaineers capitalized each time with TDs. Late in the third quarter, Shockley tossed a 34-yard touchdown to A.J. Bryant, pulling the Bulldogs to 31-28. They never got any closer. Shockley completed 20-of-33 passes for 277 yards and also rushed for 71 yards on eight carries. But it wasn’t enough against West Virginia, which ripped through the Bulldogs for 382 yards rushing. Schmitt had 82 yards on the ground and White rushed for 77. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. 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