Guru

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first_imgGuruOn 9 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today This week’s guruNewmonday hires Chinese burn kingRecruitment specialist newmonday.com has recruited a renowned bully to trainand motivate its sales division. Former actor Jeremy Barton, who was a member of Mauler McCall’s Gang in theBBC children’s classic Grange Hill, has been appointed the firm’s sales managerfor job postings. Guru was a big fan of the ginger-haired hard lad and he is confident that hewill prove an inspiration to his sales staff. No doubt under-performing members of his team can look forward to somemotivational nipple tweaks and Chinese burns, and anyone who really steps outof line had better be ready for the upside-down toilet flush. (Apparently Jeremy has already blotted his copy book with his new employerafter being caught smoking behind the photocopying machine.) Italians spice up their workplace Guru was interested to read that most Italians lighten their working days byflirting and having erotic fantasises about colleagues. Seven out of 10 Italians indulge in flirtatious behaviour and sexualinnuendo in the workplace, research has revealed. And more than a fifth ofthose surveyed said flirty behaviour had resulted in having sex with acolleague. The study concludes that this sort of behaviour helps foster a relaxing,supportive atmosphere at work. Guru begs to differ as he is still sporting a black eye and walking rathergingerly after winking suggestively at the editor last week. One in the eye for NHS director Talking of black eyes – Andrew Foster, the NHS HR director, got tongueswagging at a national conference last month when he took to the podium sportinga beauty. Despite encouragement from delegates at the Association of Healthcare HumanResource Management event, Foster was reticent to divulge how he had come byhis shiner. Rumours were rife – perhaps he had riled the Deputy PM and walked into oneof John Prescott’s legendary straight rights. Or maybe he had forgotten to buyany loo roll from Tesco, much to Mrs Foster’s annoyance. Or possibly it wasreally was a simple as walking into a door. But Guru has a feeling it was more obvious – Foster must have slipped offthe “skills escalator” which he told the conference is going to playa key role in training healthcare staff over the next few years. Union green light for red light areaDutch prostitutes have announced they are forming a trade union a year afterthe country’s Government announced the legalisation of brothels.Members of the new union, which has yet to be named, have also won a lengthybattle against the powerful ING Bank and can now operate normal businessaccounts.When the union becomes official next year the men and women who work in thesex industry will gain the same rights as regular employees in the servicesector.Guru suspects that certain terms may well be frowned upon during the newunion’s meetings. Officials may shy away from mentioning “sleepingpartners” or “lying down on the job” and section 69 willcertainly be taken out of the union handbook. Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

UE to Offer Review Course for Fundamentals of Engineering Exam

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first_imgCandidates in mechanical engineering and other disciplines candidates attend from October 6-December 1. UE to Offer Review Course for Fundamentals of Engineering ExamThe University of Evansville College of Engineering and Computer Science has announced dates for the annual review and preparation course for those planning to take the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam.Classes will be Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. in the Koch Center for Engineering and Science on the UE campus. Classes are divided into relevance per discipline. Fees are adjusted accordingly.Civil engineering candidates attend from October 6-February 2. Electrical and computer engineering candidates attend November 3-December 1.Registration forms and payment must be returned by 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, October 4.On campus registrations should be returned to Room 250 in the Koch Center for Engineering and Science.Community members may obtain registration information by contacting Kimberly Higgins via e-mail at [email protected] or phone at 812-488-2651. Early registration is encouraged as space is limited.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Critical Vote Ahead for O.C. Housing Project

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first_imgAn architectural rendering depicts what the housing authority’s Speitel Commons complex will look like when completed. (Rendering courtesy of Haley Donovan architectural firm) By DONALD WITTKOWSKIThe Ocean City Housing Authority is entering a critical phase in its efforts to line up state and federal approvals for an expansion project that symbolizes the agency’s financial turnaround in the last two years.Known as Speitel Commons, the proposed 32-unit project will provide affordable housing for senior citizens currently living in the authority’s flood-plagued Pecks Beach Village complex on Fourth Street.In the planning stages for the past few years, the project is expected to get underway in 2020 and be completed in late 2021 on a site that currently serves as a parking lot for the housing authority’s Bayview Manor complex at Sixth Street and West Avenue.Locking up the funding for the new project has been a challenging task, but the authority is expected to receive approval this month for a $4.5 million mortgage from the New Jersey Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency. The funding is scheduled for a vote at the HMFA’s board meeting Sept. 26.Rick Ginnetti, a consultant for the housing authority, said that while the funding is technically called a mortgage, it is actually closer to a grant. The authority will make no principal or interest payments on the mortgage, which will simply disappear after five years, he said.“In the affordable housing world, this is the way the mortgages work,” Ginnetti said in an interview.Ginnetti, of the Brooke Group consulting firm, gave an update on the Speitel Commons project during the authority’s monthly board meeting Tuesday. He guided the board members through a series of financial and regulatory steps that are expected to culminate with approvals from both the HMFA and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.Consultant Rick Ginnetti discusses the proposed expansion project with the Ocean City Housing Authority board members.Barring any setbacks with the approvals, the authority should be ready to close on the HMFA funding around February or March, allowing construction to begin shortly thereafter, Ginnetti said.“Those are the dates we’re going to work toward,” Ginnetti told the board members.After the meeting, Bob Barr, a city councilman who also serves as the housing authority’s board chairman, said he is pleased with the way the project is moving along.“I think things are going well, although we’ve had a few adjustments in the time line,” Barr said, referring to some of the delays with the project in the past year.He added, “I think we’re moving in the right direction.”The HMFA funding will be combined with money from the city of Ocean City to finance the housing project. HUD is not contributing toward the funding, but is part of the approval process as the parent agency for the Ocean City Housing Authority, Ginnetti said.A construction contract of $6.9 million was awarded by the authority in July for the Speitel Commons project, named in honor of the agency’s late board member, Edmond C. Speitel Sr.However, Ginnetti explained that the full cost of the project will be closer to $8 million, including construction, planning, engineering, design, permitting, insurance and the expense of relocating residents from Pecks Beach Village into the new building.The flood-prone Pecks Beach Village complex for senior citizens will be replaced by a new housing project scheduled to open in late 2021.In March, City Council approved a $6.6 million bond ordinance to build or rehabilitate affordable housing sites for senior citizens and low-income families. The projects will help Ocean City meet its state-mandated obligation to provide its “fair share” of affordable housing as part of a court settlement in 2018.One of those projects is the Speitel Commons complex. Once the senior citizens are moved into the new housing development, the flood-prone Pecks Beach Village units on the north side of Fourth Street will be demolished.In addition, a shared-services agreement with the city will also allow the authority to undertake a $2.7 million rehabilitation of 61 units of affordable housing at its Bayview Manor complex.Funding from the HMFA is separate from the city’s financial contribution. Barr stressed that Ocean City taxpayers will not have any financial obligation for the HMFA funding.He said there has been some false “scuttlebutt” around town that local taxpayers would bear the responsibility for the HMFA mortgage.“I think it’s clear now that the taxpayers won’t be on the hook for that funding,” Barr said.As the authority prepares to start construction on the senior citizens complex, the project is being touted as a symbol of the agency’s financial and operational recovery in the past two years.In a series of moves during its board meeting in August, the authority received a clean audit and paid off its remaining debt to the city. The payment to the city amounted to around $330,000 and was part of the money Ocean City gave the housing authority to help it recover from the severe flooding of Hurricane Sandy in 2012.The housing authority’s board members have been guiding the agency through a series of financial and management reforms in the past two years.During Tuesday’s board meeting, Charles Gabage, the authority’s solicitor, described how the agency has made a huge turnaround in its finances and management in the last two years, including its recovery from an embezzlement scandal involving its former chief executive, who was removed in 2017 after she was indicted.“It was absolutely a disaster,” Gabage said, noting that the authority struggled even before the embezzlement scandal.The hiring of a new executive director, the appointment of new board members and a series of financial and operational reforms helped to fix the authority’s shaky existence. The authority is now profitable, completing a turnaround that Gabage called both “unbelievable” and “incredible”“This board has really quality people on it,” Gabage said. “Everything has been really smooth. … It’s going in a great direction.”last_img read more

Brandi Carlile, Maren Morris, And More To Perform At 2019 Newport Folk Fest As The HighWomen

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first_imgThe HighWomen, a relatively-new supergroup comprised of Brandi Carlile, Maren Morris, Amanda Shires, and Natalie Hemby, has been announced as the latest act set to perform at this year’s Newport Folk Festival.With the addition of The HighWomen to the 2019 Newport Folk Fest lineup poster on Wednesday, the quartet will join previously announced including Warren Hayes, Phish’s Trey Anastasio, Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band, Billy Strings, Molly Tuttle, Benmont Tench, Gregory Alan Isakov, Jeff Tweedy, Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, Maggie Rogers, Sheryl Crow, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, and many more.As the event does with all of their performers, The HighWomen’s involvement means the festival’s charitable arm has made a donation on behalf of an organization of the artist’s choice. This time around, festival organizers have made a donation to She Is The Music, an industry-wide movement which actively works to increase opportunity and visibility for women currently working in music, as well as developing the next generation of women to join the industry and seek leadership role.The announcement on Wednesday comes a day after Carlile announced the 2020 edition of her Girls Just Wanna Weekend destination event, which will feature performances from Sheryl Crow, Lake Street Dive, Patty Griffin, Lucius, Wanda Sykes (Comedy Set), KT Tunstall, Jade Bird, Amanda Shires, and Yola. Carlile also celebrated the arrival of her new music video for “The Mother” on Wednesday as well.Fans can head to the Newport Folk Fest website for general info for this year’s event, but tickets are for the 2019 festival are sold out.last_img read more

Shuttered but humming

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first_imgDuring the white-heat search for the surviving Boston Marathon bombing suspect on Friday, Harvard shut down, along with 87 square miles of Greater Boston, as government officials had requested. But behind the campus calm, administrators and staff labored intensely to keep systems humming, and Harvard University Police aided the manhunt.Starting at 7 a.m. and for nearly 12 hours afterward, there were no classes, no shuttle buses, and no conferences at the University. Fourteen Harvard cafes and coffee shops never opened. Crimson Catering ceased operation. At Harvard College, Visitas, the weekend program for prospective freshmen, was canceled. At Harvard Law School, an alumni weekend gathering also was canceled, along with a program for prospective students.The shutdown lasted until shortly before the bombing suspect was captured Friday evening in nearby Watertown. In an email to the Harvard community Saturday, President Drew Faust remarked on the double-edged quality of Friday, a day of both vigilance and togetherness. “Yesterday was a harrowing day in a week of tragedy, suffering, and uncertainty,” she wrote, “as well as courage and solidarity.”Harvard hunkered down in tandem with the wider outside world. MBTA bus and subway service stopped. Most businesses closed. Traffic was scant. State and city officials asked citizens to “shelter at home.” Harvard officials told the University community to do likewise.But as with the world at large, Harvard’s machinery never entirely stops. On Friday, the departments that supply security, power, meals, maintenance, and custodial services kept running.Lisa Hogarty, vice president for Harvard Campus Services, summed up the operational result as “very smooth.” The College’s 6,000 students were fed three times at 12 residential Houses and at Annenberg Hall, where freshmen dine. At Annenberg, free meals were provided to Harvard police officers, custodians, and graduate students shut out of their usual dining venues.Even though Harvard hunkered down in tandem with the wider outside world on Friday, its machinery never stopped. The College’s 6,000 students were fed three times at 12 residential Houses and at Annenberg Hall, where freshmen dine.At lunchtime at Annenberg, freshmen gave dining hall workers a standing ovation. Many had been pressed into service from Crimson Catering, where workers typically start at 5 a.m.A moment later, the same students spoke for everyone in the Boston area who felt defiant and proud in the face of Monday’s terror attack. Standing to face the American flag in Annenberg, they sang the national anthem. Nina Hooper ’14 witnessed that moment and called it “lovely.” (She’s Australian.)The Harvard University Police Department (HUPD) was the tip of the spear during the shutdown. Thursday night, following the fatal shooting of a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer, HUPD kept its 3-to-11 shift on duty through the night. That doubled the police presence on campus overnight, a tactic used for the next two shifts as well, until 11 p.m. Friday, just after the manhunt ended. “We had a lot of officers working a lot of time,” said HUPD spokesman Steven Catalano. “It was all hands on deck.”HUPD officers helped pursue suspectsSome HUPD officers faced dangers on the overnight shift, as they joined a multiagency car chase through Cambridge and Watertown that ended in a gun battle with the suspected marathon bombers. “They were getting shot at, and grenades were being thrown in their area,” said Catalano of the responding Harvard officers. “They put themselves in jeopardy [that] night.”But on the University’s Cambridge and Harvard campuses Friday, quiet reigned. Visiting scholars, shut off from scheduled conferences, organized mini-tours through Harvard Yard. Others sequestered at the Faculty Club, including many Marcel Proust scholars at Harvard for an international conference marking the 100th anniversary of “Swann’s Way,” the first volume of the novel “In Search of Lost Time.” Organizer François Proulx, a lecturer in Harvard’s Department of Comparative Literature, wrote in an email: “They worked on their papers or just followed the news. One did mention brushing up on some Flaubert.”At midafternoon, National Guard soldiers stood watch on Harvard’s periphery near the entrance tunnel for MBTA buses. Two HUPD cars were at opposite ends of Harvard Yard, engines idling. Freed from classes, undergraduates played soccer and threw Frisbees and footballs. Near Massachusetts Hall, two young men played a blistering game of baseball catch.Later, with a soft rain falling, a knot of tourists — a rare sight Friday — paused near the John Harvard Statue, their umbrellas open. An undergraduate walked by on the way to dinner at Annenberg, wearing a T-shirt that was an advertisement for normalcy. It read, “No one says ‘When I grow up, I want to go to Yale.’”Beyond the crowded Yard, the streets were nearly bare of traffic. At one point, Catalano looked out the window of his Massachusetts Avenue office. He saw two pedestrians and one car. (In her email, Faust wrote of the eerie stillness of the daylong communitywide lockdown.)The emptied streets and slowed traffic seemed “crazy,” but they were a relief too, said Catalano. “Everyone followed the directions [to shelter inside]. It was a smart thing to do: Stay safe and let law enforcement do its work,” he said.Twelve Harvard alert emailsTwelve Harvard alert emails were broadcast to the community through the day. (The last, at 9:27 p.m., was a poem of joy and relief: “Suspect taken into custody in Watertown. Safe to resume normal activity.”)Hogarty praised that effective communication, including the flurry of internal emails that for Catalano began at 10:56 p.m. Thursday, after the MIT shooting. “That started a very, very long night of communication,” Catalano said, including, at 12:15 a.m. Friday, the first of many conference calls. Catalano, like many Harvard officials, barely slept. Between 2 and 4 a.m., 31 emails had flooded his computer from just two College officials, and another 25 from people elsewhere. In the morning, said Catalano, “things heated up even more.”Things stayed hot through the day for Harvard’s Crisis Management Team, too. This core group of administration deans from each School, along with Massachusetts Hall officials and vice presidents associated with operations, joined in nearly hourly groups calls — 10 of them between 6 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. alone, said Hogarty. Among the topics addressed were the timing of the closure, logistical needs (like how to staff the kitchens), and the content of messages to the Harvard community.At dinnertime, Faust joined Dean of Harvard College Evelynn M. Hammonds at Annenberg Hall, where they spent 45 minutes talking with freshmen.Around the same time, Harvard Provost (and Boston Marathoner) Alan M. Garber made the dinner rounds at Currier, Pforzheimer, and Cabot Houses to mingle with upperclassmen. Along the way, he met some students who had been diverted from the marathon just a few blocks from the finish line Monday. A few of them ran or walked all the way back to Harvard — cold, and without access to their checked personal belongings.At Annenberg, free meals were also provided to Harvard police officers, custodians, and graduate students. Following Friday’s lunch, freshmen gave the dining hall workers a standing ovation. File photo by Amanda SwinhartStudents pitch in to keep Houses workingAt Cabot House, students stepped in to make up for a staffing shortfall by washing dishes and checking in students. At Annenberg, Hooper, the freshman from Australia, organized two shifts of a dozen Class of 2016 friends to help out in the kitchen. “It was a nice chance to get to know the kitchen staff,” she wrote late Friday night.But it was more than that, she added, writing a capstone for a day of cooperation.  “There is something very special about the students at Harvard,” and it goes beyond just being bright, she wrote. “Because they come from so many different ways of life, they really know how to appreciate how good we have it here and all those who make this possible.”last_img read more

Community members participate in call-in event

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first_imgKatheryne Robinson A student calls urging representatives to promote inclusivity. A course known as Advocacy for the Common Good planned and hosted this call-in event in Geddes Hall on Monday.The Center for Social Concerns seminar, Advocacy For The Common Good, facilitated the event at Notre Dame.“It think it is our job to use our power and our education to advocate for those who are voiceless in a lot of situations,” freshman Grace Stephenson, who is a student in the course, said. Stephenson said the Notre Dame community should uphold fundamental ideals of community through events such as the call-in.“We are making these calls today because the USCCB announced nationally [that Monday] is a call-in day for Dreamers, and as part of the Catholic mission of the University, we felt compelled to honor that call through our class,” Stephenson said. Scripts were provided in Geddes for those making calls to senators and representatives. Included in the scripts were requests for government officials “to support a bipartisan, common-sense and human solution” for recipients of DACA and to “reject proposals that undermine family immigration or protections for unaccompanied children.” The course instructor, Mike Hebbeler, said recognizing human dignity and protecting families are central to Catholic social teaching. “This is very much a family issue,” Hebbeler, who is the director of discernment and advocacy for the Center for Social Concerns, said, “The calling today is very much in protection of [rec and in protection of families.”Junior Rathin Kacham said he is one of the recipients of DACA who is directly influenced by this legislation. Kacham, who is also enrolled in the course and attended the Geddes call-in, has recently become vocal about his DACA status and said he found support in both the course and the Notre Dame community.“The big deal for me is living with an eye on Washington on all times,” Kacham said. “There is a lot of uncertainty there, and I have to think about what I will do if nothing happens or if something happens; so there is a degree of anxiety there, but I’ve kind of gotten used to it.”Regardless of these anxieties, Kacham said he remains optimistic because community members continue to support him.This support extended beyond those enrolled in the Advocacy course, as other Notre Dame students and South Bend residents attended the Monday afternoon event. South Bend resident Jenario Morgan attended the event, though he has no official connection with the University. He said he supports Notre Dame in its desire to promote justice.“As a citizen of the United States, and a privilege and honor to be one, I think that everybody deserves a chance to continue our nation,” Morgan said.Hebbeler said he and his class do not plan to stop active support for recipients after Monday.“The idea is to keep amplifying those voices until policy is drafted and implemented, and new laws are created to protect our immigrant communities, to protect our families,” Hebbeler said. To follow-up on the call-in, there will be a march Friday afternoon, starting at Geddes Hall, continuing to Holy Cross College and finally proceeding to Senator Joe Donnelly’s office.More information can be found on the “Dream SB” Facebook page. Tags: Advocacy For The Common Good, call-in, Geddes Coffee House, Senator Joe Donnelly, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross students and faculty, as well as members of the South Bend community, were invited to Geddes Coffee House on Monday to make phone calls to their governmental representatives to urge protection for recipients of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), who were brought into the United States by their parents as children. The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) spearheaded the national call-in day after the U.S. Senate failed to pass legislation Feb. 15 to resolve the current uncertainty recipients of DACA face with regard to immigration policy. last_img read more

Bradley Manning Trial: Max Sentence Reduced

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning (Artwork courtesy of Deb Van Poolen, www.debvanpoolen.com)U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning’s defense team won a small victory Tuesday when the military judge presiding over his leak case dropped nearly five decades off the soldier’s possible maximum sentence, but the WikiLeaks whistleblower is still in jeopardy of spending the rest of his life behind bars.The judge, Col. Denise Lind, reduced the maximum penalty against Manning from 136 years to 90 years after ruling that several counts were duplicative, according to a military press release.Still, Manning, 25, could sit in a prison cell until he’s 115 years old if the maximum sentence holds up.Manning’s court martial is currently in the second week of its sentencing phase. Manning last week was found not guilty of “Aiding the Enemy”—the most serious charge—but was found guilty by Lind of nearly all other charges.More: Multimedia package on Bradley Manning’s caseManning was accused of leaking hundreds of thousands of classified U.S. diplomatic cables to WikiLeaks. The solider pleaded guilty in February to 10 of 22 charges brought by the U.S. government.Military prosecutors have argued that Manning’s leaks jeopardized U.S. interests abroad.Lind’s decision Tuesday came after the defense filed three separate motions to merge several counts against Manning.The sentencing case resumes Wednesday.last_img read more

Sunny time for Solar

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first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Local knowledge

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first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

French national found dead on Bali sidewalk tests positive for COVID-19

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first_imgBalinese authorities have confirmed that a French national who died on the resort island six days ago tested positive for COVID-19 post-mortem.His body was found on top of a motorcycle on a sidewalk on Jl. Imam Bonjol in Denpasar on Sunday.  “It was the foreign national who was found on Jl. Imam Bonjol,” Sanglah Hospital official I Ketut Sudartana told The Jakarta Post on Saturday . “It was confirmed after a PCR [polymerase chain reaction] test that he was coronavirus-positive.” It was initially thought that the 72-year-man had a seizure and died of a heart attack. His body was recovered by medical workers wearing hazmat suits. “We are now communicating with the [French] consulate general regarding his cremation,” the head of Bali’s COVID-19 taskforce, Dewa Made Indra, said, adding that the consulate would contact his family.Reports of the circumstances of the French national’s death came amid concerns that Bali has been underreporting COVID-19 cases. As of Friday, Bali reported only four confirmed cases, none of which were cases of local transmission, officials said. The first case was a British national who died at Sanglah Hospital. Like the French national, she was confirmed to have had the coronavirus after her death. The other two cases are Balinese residents who returned from Italy and Jakarta, two regions that are struggling to contain the virus. Experts have said that the low number of cases was “scientifically odd”.   Bali has been hit hard by the global pandemic, which has hurt global tourism. However, the resort island only decided to close its tourist sites yesterday after an instruction from the central government. It also decided to limit congregational rituals for Nyepi (Day of Silence). (mfp)Editor’s note: The article has been updated to correct the attribution of the first direct quote. Topics :last_img read more