First Nations have ability to paralyze country by shutting down trade routes

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first_imgAPTN National NewsThe commissioner of the Ontario Provincial Police has taken to YouTube to defend his department’s handling of the Idle No More movement in light of criticism thrown at it by the courts and media.Ontario’s top cop said it’s important to understand the overall strategy and that First Nations hold a lot of the power.“First Nations have the ability to paralyze this country by shutting down travel and trade routes,” said Chris Lewis in the video posted Tuesday morning. “It is a difficult situation no matter how we view or address it.”Lewis said there have been more than 60 demonstrations to date under the Idle No More banner and there hasn’t been a report of a single injury to a protestor, member of the public or officer.The OPP was criticized last week by Ontario Superior Court Justice David Brown after failing to respond to a court injunction in Tyendinaga where a small group of Mohawks shutdown the Via Rail line for seven hours.Justice Brown also slammed police in Sarnia for not acting on two injunctions he issued to have a blockade removed there. In both cases, the protestors removed the blockade and police refused to move in on them.In Tyendinaga, the OPP said it was “too dangerous” to respond to the injunction. The protestors said they made the right choice because if they had they would have stayed longer and if they would have tried to make arrests there would have been a fight.Lewis said arrests will be made after the protests if warranted. Police told Tyendinaga protestors they were under investigation for mischief.“These concepts and strategies developed from experience, hard work and common sense are difficult and complex to explain to the general public,” said Lewis.last_img read more

Maracle Tootoo Jackson and Guest just four of many who received honours

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first_imgAnnette FrancisAPTN National NewsSylvia Maracle, Jordan Tootoo, Tom Jackson and Jacqueline Guest were just four of the big names who were at Rideau Hall receiving various honours on Monday.A total of 29 people were honoured in various ways for their efforts advancing Indigenous issues.ORDER OF CANADASylvia Maracle, O.C.Toronto, OntarioOfficer of the Order of CanadaSylvia Maracle has been a leader in shaping the urban Indigenous experience in Canada. As the executive director of the Ontario Federation of Indigenous Friendship Centres, she has transformed the organization from a handful of reception hubs for migrating Indigenous peoples into more than two dozen culturally grounded centres of community building. An in-demand consultant, speaker, social activist and cultural-based practitioner, she is actively involved in diverse initiatives supporting the well-being of Indigenous peoples across Canada.Gord Downie, C.M.Toronto, OntarioMember of the Order of CanadaFor over 30 years, Gord Downie has been the frontman for The Tragically Hip and is considered one of Canada’s most beloved artists. He is renowned for his memorable performances, his songwriting and his lyrical references that create a sense of what it is like to love, and live in, this country. His charitable contributions and social activism continue to have a significant impact. He is devoted to promoting dialogue, raising awareness of the history of residential schools and moving the country along the path to reconciliation.Jacqueline Guest, C.M.Bragg Creek, AlbertaMember of the Order of CanadaJacqueline Guest has been a staunch advocate of youth and adult literacy in Canada and abroad. An author with strong Métis roots, she has penned numerous novels that have inspired a love of reading among children and teenagers while showcasing Indigenous culture and teaching readers to overcome obstacles. Over the course of her career, she has also served as a guest speaker and educator in Canadian, American and Tanzanian schools and libraries, where she has promoted literacy and emphasized the importance of storytelling in Canadian history.MERITORIOUS SERVICE DECORATIONS (CIVIL DIVISION)Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, M.S.C.Iqaluit, NunavutMeritorious Service Cross (Civil Division)The founder of Unikkaat Studio Inc., Alethea Arnaquq-Baril inspires Inuit communities to reconnect with their ancestral values and lost traditions through her many films. Considered one of Canada’s top female directors, she uses her films to document the Inuit language and culture in communities throughout Nunavut.J. Wilton Littlechild, C.M., A.O.E., M.S.C, Q.C.Hobbema, AlbertaThe Honourable Murray Sinclair, M.S.C.Winnipeg, ManitobaMarie Wilson, C.M., M.S.C.Yellowknife, Northwest TerritoriesMeritorious Service Cross (Civil Division)Justice Murray Sinclair, Chief Wilton Littlechild and Marie Wilson shouldered the responsibility for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada with fortitude, compassion and perseverance. Over six years, they led the examination of the Indian Residential School system, combing through myriad documents and witnessing the courage of survivors who shared their stories. Their final report invites all Canadians to confront the inequities of the past, and calls on governments and individuals alike to move forward, with greater understanding, towards reconciliation.The Meritorious Service Cross awarded to the Honourable Murray Sinclair will be presented to him at a later date.Stanley Vollant, C.Q., M.S.C.Pessamit, QuebecMeritorious Service Cross (Civil Division)To promote Indigenous cultural heritage, Dr. Stanley Vollant set out on the Innu Meshkenu(My Innu Path), a 6 000-km walk that passed through Indigenous communities across eastern Canada. This initiative inspired a multitude of Indigenous and non-Indigenous walkers to join him, but more than that, it encouraged an entire generation of young people to stay in school and pursue their dreams.Elder John Elliott, M.S.M.Victoria, British ColumbiaElder Elmer Seniemten George, M.S.M.Brantwood Bay, British ColumbiaMeritorious Service Medal (Civil Division)Elder John Elliott and Elder Elmer Seniemten George translated the Douglas Treaties of themid-1850s into the Lekwungen and SENĆOŦEN First Nation languages. Their translation sheds light on the lack of understanding that existed between Colonialists and First Nations when the treaties were first signed. It also provides a foundation for reconciliation and lasting relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians of today.Hovak Johnston, M.S.M.Yellowknife, Northwest TerritoriesMarjorie Tahbone, M.S.M.Nome, Alaska, United States of AmericaMeritorious Service Medal (Civil Division)Hovak Johnston and Marjorie Tahbone created the Inuit Tattoo Revitalization Project tore-establish an Inuit art form that was on the verge of being lost. Traditionally, tattoos were given to women by women as a rite of passage and to represent their family’s heritage. The project’s first six-day event in Kugluktuk, Nunavut, reconnected more than two dozen women with their culture and inspired a new generation to carry on this tradition.The Meritorious Service Medal awarded to Marjorie Tahbone will be presented to her at a later date.Tina Keeper, O.M., M.S.M.André Lewis, M.S.M.Mary Richard, O.M., M.S.M. (posthumous)Winnipeg, ManitobaMeritorious Service Medal (Civil Division)Fulfilling the vision of the late Mary Richard, Tina Keeper and André Lewis producedGoing Home Star–Truth and Reconciliation. Performed across the country by the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, it tells the story of a young Aboriginal couple confronting a painful past. Harnessing a traditional European art form to connect with First Nations’ culture, this emotional production sheds light on the significant impact of residential schools on our history and helps to establish new relationships among Canadians.The Meritorious Service Medal awarded to the late Mary Richard will be presented to her granddaughter, Ms. Ashley Richard.William MacLeod, M.S.M.Mistissini, QuebecMeritorious Service Medal (Civil Division)William MacLeod is a leader in economic development for northern Quebec. In a single decade, he made the Cree Construction and Development Company one of the top construction companies in Quebec. His economic achievements have since inspired Cree youth, motivating them to take on leadership roles in their communities while remaining true to their roots.Meikaleigh McDonald, M.S.M.Fort Smith, Northwest TerritoriesMeritorious Service Medal (Civil Division)Meikaleigh McDonald competed in 10 Arctic Winter Games (AWG), where she won numerous medals and set records in the Alaskan high kick and the triple jump. Now a member of theAWG International Committee, she continues to promote traditional sports in northern Canada and abroad, inspiring a new generation of athletes and helping to reconnect northern youth to their culture, their elders and their community.Julie Pellissier-Lush, M.S.M.Summerside, Prince Edward IslandMeritorious Service Medal (Civil Division)Founding member of the Mi’kmaq Legends theatre troupe, Julie Pellissier-Lush preserves the legends of her ancestors through her work as a writer, actress and mentor to young performers. Dubbed the “Mama Bear” of the group by her fellow cast members, she is the glue that holds them together as they combine drama, storytelling, music and dance to share tales of the past with today’s youth.Percy Sacobie, M.S.M.Fredericton, New BrunswickMeritorious Service Medal (Civil Division)Percy Sacobie built the Take a Break Lodge, a sweat lodge on St. Mary’s First Nation, to help people on their journey to recovery from mental illness and addiction. Having experienced the benefits of the traditional sweat ceremony himself, he wanted to give the greater Fredericton community access to a safe and welcoming place to practice self-reflection, to reconnect spiritually and to recover from their ailments.Jordin Tootoo, M.S.M.Coquitlam, British ColumbiaMeritorious Service Medal (Civil Division)Jordin Tootoo uses his star power as an NHL hockey player to promote healthy lifestyles in Canada’s North. Through the Team Tootoo Fund, he encourages conversations about addiction and suicide, and inspires youth to stay in school and pursue their dreams.POLAR MEDALAnn Maje RaiderWatson Lake, YukonAnn Raider has demonstrated exemplary dedication to community healing and enhanced safety. As the executive director of the Liard Aboriginal Women’s Society (LAWS), she was instrumental in the creation of the Together for Justice community safety protocol which, in collaboration with the RCMP, established a framework that profoundly strengthened community-police relations in Watson Lake, Yukon. This protocol has since been adopted by communities throughout northern Canada and has achieved similar successful outcomes.Darlene ScurveyWhitehorse, YukonAs an early childhood educator at the Duska’a Head Start Family Learning Centre,Darlene Scurvey actively promotes the preservation of traditional language and culture. With the assistance of elders, she provides preschool-age children with a range of culturally relevant learning experiences that incorporate social interaction and language instruction.SOVEREIGN’S MEDAL FOR VOLUNTEERSBarbara BernardScotchfort, Prince Edward IslandA community builder and organizer, Barbara Bernard has served nearly a decade with the Aboriginal Women’s Association of Prince Edward Island, and has generously shared her knowledge and teachings with young people from across the province.Pauline BuschFort Qu’Appelle, SaskatchewanPresident of the Aboriginal Women of Manitoba for 10 years, Pauline Busch championed several important initiatives to eliminate family violence and crimes against Indigenous women and girls. She has also demonstrated a passionate commitment to restorative justice through her involvement with Indian Residential Schools Resolutions Canada.Anita CampbellThompson, ManitobaA dedicated supporter of the Métis people, Anita Campbell has worked with the Manitoba Métis Federation and the Métis Women of Manitoba for several years. She has helped to deliver vital services and programs to members of her community and has inspired others to follow in her footsteps.William CranmerAlert Bay, British ColumbiaDedicated to the preservation of Indigenous culture, Chief Bill Cranmer was instrumental in repatriating potlatch artifacts that were confiscated by the Canadian government in the 1920s, and in founding two cultural centres in British Columbia to preserve and exhibit these sacred items.Pamela Glode-DesrochersHalifax, Nova ScotiaPamela Glode-Desrochers is the executive director of the Mi’kmaw Native Friendship Centre. She has worked for 40 years to reduce poverty and crime, and to promote the personal and community well-being of Halifax’s urban Aboriginal population.Daryl Dancing Buffalo KootenayMorley, AlbertaDarryl Kootenay has rapidly become a leading force for change in the world through his work with such organizations as Canada World Youth and Canada Bridges. He is also committed to helping youth in his own community, and is noted for founding the first Stoney Nakoda Youth Council.Jarret LeamanToronto, OntarioA dynamic volunteer and community leader, Jarret Leaman has generously given of his time to numerous causes in support of Indigenous youth, entrepreneurs and LGBTQ issues.Opolahsomuwehs Imelda PerleyFredericton, New BrunswickTeacher and Maliseet speaker Imelda Perley has committed much of her time to teaching language, storytelling and other traditions in Indigenous communities. Her efforts have fostered greater understanding and tolerance among the citizens of St. Mary’s, Kingclear and Tobique.Odelle PikeStephenville, Newfoundland and LabradorA prominent advocate for Indigenous women and seniors, Odelle Pike has worked tirelessly to advance the cause of her people through her involvement with numerous provincial organizations, including the Newfoundland Aboriginal Women’s Network and the Newfoundland Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse.Marilyn SarkLennox Island, Prince Edward IslandMarilyn Sark has dedicated her life to supporting Indigenous communities in Prince Edward Island by taking on several leadership positions, notably with the Aboriginal Nurses’ Association of Canada and the Aboriginal Women’s Association of PEI. She has also brought essential health servicList and description courtesy Rideau Halllast_img read more

So What If These Arent The Two Best Teams In Baseball

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The 2014 World Series begins Tuesday night, featuring a pair of unlikely combatants in the 89-win Kansas City Royals and the 88-win San Francisco Giants.How unlikely? The Royals rank as the third-most unexpected pennant winner since 1969 — trailing only the 2008 Tampa Bay Rays and 2006 Detroit Tigers — according to our Weighted Average Loss Total metric. And while the Giants have won a pair of championships in the last five seasons, their cumulative record over the past two seasons has barely cracked .500.The fact that San Francisco and Kansas City combined for just 177 regular-season wins this year, the fourth-fewest by any pair of World Series opponents ever, has not been lost on the blogosphere. Amid the usual TV-ratings-fueled hand-wringing over whether baseball is or is not dying (it’s not), the Internet also spent the past several days worrying about whether this is the worst World Series ever (or, alternatively, angrily defending the matchup, or just wondering why we care about the teams’ regular-season records in the first place).For the statistically inclined, it’s an interesting series, if not simply from a philosophical point of view. It’s true that these teams probably aren’t the best two in baseball, and that has led to what Daniel Meyer of Beyond the Box Score called an “existential crisis” for some fans:“What is the point of it all?” and “Why even play 162 games?” are questions being thrown around as we all lament the reality of a World Series without Mike Trout or Clayton Kershaw.But in the same article, Meyer notes that Major League Baseball’s regular season (not even the playoffs, which are almost universally regarded as a crapshoot, but the 162-game regular season) is too short to definitively allow the best team to stand out from the pack. Even if MLB expanded to a schedule of 1,000 games per team (!!), the true best team in baseball would have less than a 54 percent chance of producing the regular season’s best record.Along the same lines, there’s the classic Bill James simulation from the 1980s estimating that the best team in baseball only wins the World Series a little more than 29 percent of the time. And more recent research by Dr. Jesse Frey of Villanova University found that in a typical MLB season we can’t be more than about 40 percent confident in the identity of baseball’s best team anyway.In other words, there’s a lot of ambiguity, from start to finish. While it seems unlikely that a team like the Royals or the Giants could secretly be baseball’s best despite unimpressive regular-season records, we don’t really know for sure — and besides, the playoffs aren’t a scientific experiment designed to conclusively identify baseball’s best team (otherwise, they’d look like this).Embrace the uncertainty, and just enjoy this World Series as a showdown of two good, evenly matched teams. After all, there’s a 100 percent chance this matchup will contain the 2014 MLB champion. read more

Guardiola backs the use of VAR

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first_imgThe Manchester City manager is happy that UEFA will use the technology for the knockout stages of the Champions LeagueUEFA has announced that the Video Assistant Referee (VAR) technology will be used in the Champions League this season.But it will be introduced only in the knockout stages, which means it will only be used starting next year.And Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola is very happy about it.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…“I welcome the news, I’m delighted with it,” he told France 24.“The Premier League is the last one [to adopt VAR] and sooner or later it will happen.”“This season, our second goal against Shakhtar was a ridiculous penalty. It’s so we don’t have to talk about it or to talk about last season versus Liverpool,” he added.“Now with VAR, we are looking to make better football, better decisions. Most of the time, not always, the ref will do a good job. Everyone makes mistakes and they’ll be helped by it and it will be good.”last_img read more

Soldotna Man Rescued At Camp Island Lake

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first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Alaska State Troopers received a call shortly after 11am, on Saturday of a man who had injured his knee on Camp Island Lake. Troopers and EMS got to Thompson on foot and by snow machine. Life Med then transported Thompson to Central Peninsula Hospital for further treatment. Hunter Thompson, age 19, of Soldotna reported he was too injured to walk back to his truck on Swanson River Road, approximately 2 miles away, according to an online Trooper dispatch.last_img

Reform of Baltimores Civilian Review Board Passes Md General Assembly

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first_imgBaltimore’s Civilian Review Board will soon have two new members and will be required to hold during the year, at least four of its monthly meetings in locations around the city, rather than at police headquarters downtown.Senate Bill 882, sponsored by Sen. Joan Conway (D-Baltimore City), passed the General Assembly and will require Baltimore’s Civilian Review Board to add two new members, one each from the ACLU Maryland and the Baltimore City NAACP. Both members are to be selected by the mayor of Baltimore City.The bill originally aimed to place all law enforcement agencies operating in Maryland under the jurisdiction of the review board, but the Maryland Transit Administration and the police agency of the University of Maryland system, both state agencies, were ultimately exempted from the bill, according to Dr. Marvin Cheatham, head of the coalition which sought to have the bill passed.“We would have preferred [those agencies] being in [the law], but as a result of that . . . the [Maryland Transit Administration] has agreed to meet with [our coalition] and get from them what are their guidelines for people filing complaints, where do people go, and we will be encouraging them to do a stronger public relations piece, so people will know what to do,” said Cheatham.The Civilian Review Board has been in danger of not reaching a quorum at its monthly meetings because four of the five seats on the board are not currently filled, said Cheatham. The two new members should help address this issue.Del. Nathaniel Oaks (D-Baltimore City), who sponsored the House version of the bill, said that, in an ideal world, he would have liked to see the University of Maryland police system placed under the jurisdiction of the Civilian Review Board, since they have arrest files in Baltimore City.“There were some things that we wanted that I got [in the bill] so I’m pleased with that,” said Oaks. “Not necessarily satisfied, but I’m pleased.”ralejandro@afro.comlast_img read more

Bill Cosby Gets 3 to 10 Years in Prison for Sex Assault

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first_imgBy The Associated PressHis Hollywood career and good-guy image in ruins, an 81-year-old Bill Cosby was sentenced Tuesday to three to 10 years behind bars for drugging and sexually assaulting a woman, becoming the first celebrity of the #MeToo era to be sent to prison.The punishment all but completed the dizzying, late-in-life fall from grace for the comedian, former TV star and breaker of racial barriers.Bill Cosby is the first celebrity of the #MeToo era to be sent to prison. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)“It is time for justice. Mr. Cosby, this has all circled back to you. The time has come,” Montgomery County Judge Steven O’Neill said. He quoted from victim Andrea Constand’s own statement to the court, in which she said Cosby took her “beautiful, young spirit and crushed it.”Cosby declined the opportunity to speak before the sentence came down, and afterward he sat and chatted with his spokesman and a lawyer, seemingly in good spirits. His wife of 54 years, Camille, was not in court. Constand smiled upon hearing the punishment and was hugged by others in the courtroom.Cosby’s lawyers asked that he be allowed to remain free on bail, but the judge appeared incredulous over the request and said he would not treat the celebrity any differently from others.The punishment came at the end of a two-day hearing at which the judge declared Cosby a “sexually violent predator” — a modern-day scarlet letter that subjects him to monthly counseling for the rest of his life and requires that neighbors and schools be notified of his whereabouts.The comic once known as America’s Dad for his role on the top-rated “Cosby Show” in the 1980s was convicted in April of violating Constand, Temple University women’s basketball administrator, at his suburban Philadelphia estate in 2004. It was the first celebrity trial of the #MeToo era.Cosby faced a sentence of anywhere from probation to 10 years in prison. His lawyers asked for house arrest, saying Cosby — who is legally blind — is too old and vulnerable to do time in prison. Prosecutors asked for five to 10 years behind bars, saying he could still pose a threat to women.Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele rejected the notion that Cosby’s age and infirmity entitle him to mercy. “He was good at hiding this for a long time. Good at suppressing this for a long time. So it’s taken a long time to get there,” Steele said.The sentencing came as another extraordinary #MeToo drama unfolded on Capitol Hill, where Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh stands accused of sexual misconduct more than three decades ago.The Cosby case “really raised awareness of the pervasiveness of … sexual misconduct against subordinates and against women of relatively less power,” said Daniel Filler, dean of Drexel University’s law school. “For jurors, I think it’s inherently changed the credibility of the accusers.”In the years since Constand first went to authorities in 2005, more than 60 women have accused Cosby of sexual misconduct, though none of those claims have led to criminal charges.The judge ruled on Cosby’s “sexually violent predator” status after a psychologist for the state testified that the entertainer appears to have a mental disorder that gives him an uncontrollable urge to have sex with women without their consent. When the ruling came down, a woman in the courtroom shot her fist into the air and whispered, “Yessss!”In a statement submitted to the court and released Tuesday, Constand, now 45, that she has had to cope with years of anxiety and self-doubt. She said she now lives alone with her two dogs and has trouble trusting people.“When the sexual assault happened, I was a young woman brimming with confidence and looking forward to a future bright with possibilities,” she wrote in her five-page statement. “Now, almost 15 years later, I’m a middle-aged woman who’s been stuck in a holding pattern for most of her adult life, unable to heal fully or to move forward.”She also wrote of Cosby: “We may never know the full extent of his double life as a sexual predator, but his decades-long reign of terror as a serial rapist is over.”The AP does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they come forward publicly, which Constand and other accusers have done.Constand went to police a year after waking up in a fog at Cosby’s gated estate, her clothes askew, only to have the district attorney pass on the case.Another district attorney reopened the file a decade later and charged the TV star after stand-up comic Hannibal Buress’ riff about Cosby being a rapist prompted more accusers to come forward and after a federal judge, acting on a request from The Associated Press, unsealed some of Cosby’s startling, decade-old testimony in Constand’s related civil suit.In his testimony, Cosby described sexual encounters with a string of actresses, models and other young women and talked about obtaining quaaludes to give to those he wanted to sleep with.Cosby’s first trial in 2017 ended with a hung jury. He was convicted at a retrial that opened months after the #MeToo movement had taken down such figures as Hollywood studio boss Harvey Weinstein, NBC’s Matt Lauer, actor Kevin Spacey and Sen. Al Franken.Constand said Cosby gave her what she thought were herbal pills to ease stress, then penetrated her with his fingers as she lay immobilized on a couch. Cosby claimed the encounter was consensual, and his lawyers branded her a “con artist” who framed the comedian to get a big payday — a $3.4 million settlement she received over a decade ago.Five other accusers took the stand at the trial as part of an effort by prosecutors to portray him as a predator.Cosby, whose estimated fortune once topped $400 million, broke barriers in the 1960s as the first black actor to star in a network show, “I Spy.” He went on to superstardom as wise and understanding Dr. Cliff Huxtable on “The Cosby Show,” a sitcom that showed America a new kind of black TV family: a warm and loving household led by two professionals, one a lawyer, the other a doctor.He also found success with his Saturday morning cartoon “Fat Albert,” appeared in commercials for Jello-O pudding and became a public moralist, lecturing the black community about young people stealing things and wearing baggy pants. He won a Presidential Medal of Freedom and countless Emmys, Golden Globes and Grammy awards.As the allegations mounted, his career all but collapsed, “Cosby Show” reruns were taken off the air, and one college after another stripped him of his honorary degrees.last_img read more

Delhi to host IFLC

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first_imgA joint collaboration between Educational Endowment Trust, Ministry of Culture, Government of India and UN Information Centre for India and Bhutan, it aims to celebrate linguistic diversity and promote universal peace. This event will see the participation of school children from these 17 countries – India, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Germany, Kyrgyzstan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Tanzania, Tunisia, Ukraine, Hungary, US-TX, Georgia and Russia.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’ The city will boast international presence as 43 international students and 18 mentors will participate along with 350 Delhi Schools on the theme- “Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam – ‘The world is one family’. The Capital’s Springdale’s School, The Frank Antony Public School, Ahlcon International School, Mata Gujri School, Tagore International School and Bluebells International School are also participating. Bilal Acikgoz, one of the coordinators of IFLC 2016, said: “We believe that understanding different languages and cultures helps us understand each other better, and that is the motive behind IFLC.” Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix Lauding the potential of Indian students he said, “I would also like to share that in India we have seen tremendous talent and potential in the students. They deserve serious attention of global educational and cultural organisations.“I think the international education fraternity should work in close cooperation with their Indian counterparts to provide the opportunities the Indian students truly deserve. The Educational Endowment Trust itself is keen to explore the talents of Indian students in other parts of India as well, especially in states like Maharashtra, UP, Punjab, Tamil Nadu and Uttarakhand.” IFLC is a global effort to facilitate a cordial engagement between the young change makers from different parts of the world. Their mission clearly says- “It is our mission to rise on the wings of art and music and promote peace, love, and cultural encounters throughout the world’. India will witness the event for the first time since its inception in 2003.last_img read more

Rep Hoitenga votes to make state government more accountable

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first_img Plan extends open record requirements to governor, LegislatureState Rep. Michele Hoitenga today voted to approve a bipartisan plan to make state government more accountable to the people of Michigan.Hoitenga, of Manton, said the House unanimously approved the multi-bill proposal, which she co-sponsored.“Transparency at all levels of government is an absolute necessity,” said Hoitenga, who was subject to open records law as the mayor of Manton. “We’re all here to serve the public, and the public must be able to hold us accountable. It’s time to hold state government to the same transparency standards we require from local officials.”Michigan is one of just two states that still exempts its governor and the Legislature from open records laws. The bipartisan solution approved today would end these exemptions and increase transparency in state government.The proposal will subject the governor and lieutenant governor to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and hold state representatives and senators to the same high standard by creating the Legislative Open Records Act (LORA).While LORA mirrors FOIA in many ways, there are exemptions for constituent inquiries to ensure that personal information is protected and kept private. Other types of communications – including those lawmakers have with state departments and lobbyists – would not be exempt.House Bills 4007-13 and 4015-16 now advance to the Senate for consideration. Categories: Hoitenga News,News 19Mar Rep. Hoitenga votes to make state government more accountablelast_img read more