Chinese buyer pays $7m in cash for prime development in suburban Brisbane, with no plans to develop

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first_imgThis property at 390-402 Benhiam St, Calamvale, has sold for $7m. Picture: realestate.com.auA CHINESE buyer has paid $7 million in cash for a huge property with two titles in the outer Brisbane suburb of Calamvale — but he has no plans to develop it.The large six-bedroom, brick home on a huge 20,400 sqm site at 390-402 Benhiam Street attracted more than 100 people to its first open home, but there was one offer the owners couldn’t refuse.A Chinese buyer has paid $7m cash for this property at 390-402 Benhiam St, Calamvale. Picture: realestate.com.auRay White Sunnybank Hills principal Eric Li, who negotiated the sale, said the buyer offered $7 million in cash unconditional with a two week settlement on the spot.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:15Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:15 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenThe magic of compound interest01:15“He just wanted to buy straight away,” Mr Li said.“He could see the competition and didn’t want to miss out.”GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HEREMr Li said the buyer had been looking for a big block of land in the area and was very keen to buy.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor3 hours agoThe property at 390-402 Benhiam St, Calamvale, has two titles. Picture: realestate.com.auPerhaps surprisingly, he plans to move straight in with no intentions of developing the property.Mr Li said it was another example of the appetite from Chinese buyers for property in the Sunnybank area.What is Hamptons style?Golf course home breaks recordBrisbane property on the riseThe house itself is about 25 years old and has five bathrooms and a 10 car garage.It’s close to public transport, local shops and Sunnybank.The property had been marketed as having “huge future development potential”.Calamvale is 17km from the CBD and has a median house price of $650,000.last_img read more

Joseph Mariathasan: Are LDI valuations right for an entity like USS?

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first_imgThe strike by academic staff at UK universities over changes to the Universities Superannuation Scheme (USS) is clearly damaging for students and it is a sad state of affairs that other means of discussion were not able to resolve the issues.USS is the UK’s largest pension scheme and the issues it faces are reflective of the issues faced by any still open defined benefit pension schemes. In the case of the USS, there is another factor to bear in mind, which is that universities are public entities and indeed, staff at newer universities are on a different scheme.One of the key issues in the debate is how much risk the fund should take and indeed, how that risk should be measured. Liabilities are priced off the back of Gilt yields that are themselves artificially depressed through quantitative easing, while the risk management approach of liability-driven investment (LDI) forces the purchase of Gilts irrespective of price.Assuming such low yields will persist forever and that pension funds need to be able to fund liabilities on that basis is the reason why defined benefit transfers have become so attractive for some individuals. Some schemes have been offering transferees multiples in the region of 40 times projected annual pension income. For those willing to take capital risk – which clearly may not suit everyone – the income yield on a diversified portfolio including equities would easily beat yields of 2% available on 30-year Gilts. But what may be suitable for some individuals seems impossible for a fund, even though the fund has a much longer time horizon. But should open defined benefit pension schemes be so concerned about mark-to-market capital fluctuations if there is no intention to close the scheme down?Some would argue that LDI-driven fixation on purchasing sovereign debt irrespective of the price is a form of financial repression. The driving forces have been a mixture of accounting changes, regulatory issues and the underlying movement towards treating LDI as a purely risk management problem. These have set in stone the present values of pension liabilities based on government bond yields that we know will change each year.The net result is that matching pension liabilities is seen as a risk management issue rather than an investment issue, so pricing of debt has become irrelevant. Pension funds are therefore unable to invest in long-term risky assets, whether in the UK or overseas, despite having long-term liabilities.But the ultimate risk taker in a country is the state itself. There is a case to be made for setting up a UK sovereign wealth fund financed by issuing Gilts sold to UK pension funds. This would, in effect, be acting as an intermediary guaranteeing pension funds the ability to meet their liabilities whilst generating much higher cashflows from elsewhere.The House of Commons debated the idea in December 2016. One of the briefing papers for the debate was an article I wrote in 2012 for IPE. In the article, I had suggested that given an aging population, the UK should set up a sovereign wealth fund to add to tier one pension provisions. As MPs pointed out in the debate, there is an issue of inter-generational justice when it comes to allocating resources within a country. An increasing aging population cannot expect to solely rely on the Ponzi-type economics of taxing a declining younger population for future pensions.Investing a sovereign wealth fund in emerging market equities, for example, with many funds currently offering yields well in excess of 4% and even 5% in some cases, would easily cover the cost of the Gilt coupons while receiving dividends produced by younger populations outside the UK.A sovereign wealth fund may have some benefits for the USS. More issuance of Gilts will push yields up a bit, thereby reducing liabilities and the deficit. But perhaps the real issue is a political decision on whether LDI valuations are appropriate for a public sector entity.last_img read more

Connector Stays on Hornsea Project One

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first_imgNorwegian shipowner Ocean Yield has entered a contract for extension of the charter for its cable lay vessel Connector, working at the Hornsea Project One offshore wind farm site in the UK.The vessel will continue carrying out cable lay operations for Ørsted’s 1.2GW offshore wind project for a firm period up to 30 September, with an option to further extend this period until 19 November.In April, DEME Group’s subsidiary Tideway, in charge of the export cable installation for Hornsea Project One, installed the first cable section at the project site using Ocean Yield’s Connector.Along the Connector, Tideway is also utilising its new vessel Living Stone, which recently joined the Hornsea One operations.When operational in 2020, the 174-turbine Hornsea Project One will be the first wind farm in the world with a capacity over 1GW and capable of providing clean electricity to well over one million homes, according to Ørsted.last_img read more

Seven-day closure of S.R. 48 begins Monday in Ripley County

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first_imgSunman, IN— S.R. 48 will close on Monday, October 14, between S.R. 129 and S.R. 101 for a box culvert replacement over a Branch of Ripley Creek in Ripley County. The road is scheduled to close for seven days and is expected to reopen by Monday, October 21, weather permitting.The culvert is located approximately four miles east of S.R. 129 and just west of Spades Road. The official detour for the closure is S.R. 129 to S.R. 350 to S.R. 101. The contract was awarded to Sunesis Construction in July 2019 for $164,500.last_img

Pulis in mood to celebrate status

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first_img Press Association Stoke are laying on a celebration of their 150th anniversary on Sunday and manager Tony Pulis believes they reach the landmark as an established top-flight side for the first time. “I think the outlook has been changing for a few years. We have secured the chance for our sixth consecutive season in the Premier League and that’s fantastic for a club once going nowhere as an average Championship side – let’s not kid ourselves there – but now an established Premier League club.” Despite that assertion, Pulis remains fully aware of how precarious any team’s position can be in an unpredictable football climate. After last week’s 1-1 draw at Sunderland his side were in sight of their best ever finish at the highest level despite not yet being mathematically safe from the drop. Criticism from the stands has been more noticeable than ever before this season, but with a top-half finish still on the cards Pulis sees that as a result of rising expectations rather than any under-performance on his part. “I think it’s been a surreal season, not just for Stoke, but for the Premier League. Before Wigan’s game on Tuesday night, we were 11th and still in contention to get relegated which is unbelievable; I’ve never known that,” he said. “We’ve done it (survived) in the past with seven or eight games to go and it’s been a walk in the park but it’s very different this year. “People expect more and that’s the way it is. The more successful you are the more they want. That’s a challenge for everybody here. “If you don’t reach the standards some people think you should be reaching they criticise you.” center_img Pulis guided the side into the Barclays Premier League in 2008 and, barring an inconceivable sequence of results elsewhere, will compete in a sixth consecutive season at that level next term. “I think that’s it now. I think we have worked hard enough to be looked upon as an established Premier League club after six years,” he said. last_img read more

John Stones backs Everton midfielder Tom Cleverley for England recall

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first_img He said: “We are going to see two teams that are both built to score goals and are both having a very good moment of belief and confidence. “They [Stoke] have got a lot of creativity in the side, a lot of arrogance in the right way, and I think it’s going to be a really open game with two teams looking to get the three points rather than just trying to get through a game.” Martinez rested Gerard Deulofeu and Arouna Kone at St James’ Park with the Spaniard used only as a second-half substitute and the Ivorian not at all. He will use the depth of his squad once more against the Potters with striker Steven Naismith back in contention after an ankle problem and Phil Jagielka, Bryan Oviedo, James McCarthy and Steven Pienaar all close to returns. The 26-year-old midfielder won the last of his 13 senior England caps in a friendly against Germany in November 2013 during his Manchester United days having at one point found himself the subject of a fans’ petition demanding that he was never picked again. However, having rebuilt his career at Goodison Park, Stones believes Cleverley has earned the right to be considered once again as national boss Roy Hodgson assesses his options for next summer’s Euro 2016 finals. He told evertontv: “I know as players you’re biased to your own team-mates, but I think it’s only right that I speak on behalf of a lot of the lads in our dressing room when I say Tom should be in the England squad – on current form at least. “He’s playing terrifically well. Sometimes players don’t get too many chances to get back into the squad, but I’m sure he would be delighted to.” Stones’ comments came after Cleverley snatched a 1-0 Barclays Premier League victory for his team with the final touch of the game at Newcastle on Boxing Day. The midfielder’s looping 93rd-minute header handed the Toffees a deserved victory, but one which did not look to be coming their way as the Magpies defended stubbornly to take themselves within seconds of a draw, and in the process cemented his status within the squad following his summer switch to Merseyside. Stones said: “It took a lifetime to go in but thankfully it got there in the end! “He feels like an Everton player. He loves everything about the club – the training, the fans – and he’s just fitted in so well. He’s a great lad and the goal should top that off for Christmas.” Victory on Tyneside eased Roberto Martinez’s men into ninth place in the table, just three points behind Manchester United in sixth, ahead of Monday’s home clash with Stoke, who got the better of Louis van Gaal’s side on Saturday. Martinez is relishing a showdown between two sides he believes will go all-out for victory rather than trying simply to survive a second game in three days. Press Association England defender John Stones has backed Everton team-mate Tom Cleverley to return to the international fold. last_img read more

Hickerson wins Open Singles title at Forbes Burnham Memorial TT

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first_imgORIN Hickerson was crowned champion of the Open Singles division on the final night of Forbes Burnham Memorial Table Tennis Championships, played on Tuesday evening at the Cliff Anderson Sports Hall.Hickerson, who stopped former Senior National champion Nigel Bryan by a score of 4-1 (11-7, 11-9, 5-11, 11-5, 11-9) in their semi-final clash on Monday night, was able to get past Elishaba Johnson in the final.Johnson, who had defeated Johnathan Van Lange in both the U-21 and ‘B’ division finals, got past the 13-year-old for a third time on Tuesday night. He had reached the semi-finals after defeating Isaiah Layne 4-1 (11-8, 6-11, 11-9, 18-16).Van Lange had gotten the better of Paul Meusa 4-0 (11-8, 11-8, 11-6, 12-10) in their quarterfinal clash. The teenager though could not prevail over Johnson in the semis, although he was leading 2-1 early in their best-in-five clash (12-10, 9-11, 11-9, 7-11, 5-11, 6-11).Johnson, who turned 21 this month, opened the final with a victory, but the more experienced Hickerson was able to rally back with aggressive backhands and long serves to win four straight games (6-11, 11-9, 11-9, 11-6 and 11-8).Bryan and Van Lange were crowned joint third-place finishers.Members of the Forbes Burnham Foundation later presented the winners with their trophies.last_img read more

Syracuse continues search to replace McCullough’s contributions on offense, defense

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first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Michael Gbinije noticed it in pregame warm-ups before facing Wake Forest on Tuesday night.Syracuse wasn’t laughing as much. It wasn’t as loose. Its 6-foot-10 freshman forward stood hunched over a pair of crutches wearing black pants, a black T-shirt and a gold chain — a far cry from a basketball uniform.Orange head coach Jim Boeheim noticed it during the game. SU’s scoring load fell almost exclusively into three players’ hands. The wings of the 2-3 zone were late on rotation after rotation. The Demon Deacons could leave Tyler Roberson wide open in the high post and not pay for it.Whether it was before or during Syracuse’s win over WFU, the absence of Chris McCullough was apparent in the first game since he was ruled out for the season with a tear in his right ACL.“It hurts us more this year than most of the years I’ve been here because we’ve always had another guy that we could get in there,” Boeheim said. “But we’re really struggling right now.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAfter working through McCullough’s personal growing pains — the high-potential freshman started his career with eight straight double-digit scoring games before scoring seven or less in the seven before his injury — the Orange is now entering an even more trying process.SU isn’t just trying to replace the 9.3 points and 6.9 rebounds that McCullough was averaging, but also his around-the-rim defense and intangible ability to draw opposing defenses away from Syracuse’s more consistent scoring options. And the search for answers on both ends of the floor continues as Syracuse (13-4, 4-0 Atlantic Coast) travels to play at Clemson (9-7, 1-3) at 4 p.m. on Saturday.“I think Roberson and Kaleb (Joseph) and (Ron) Patterson are going to have some big games coming up down the stretch,” Gbinije said. “They’re going to get it going, I have a good feeling about that, and if we’re going to be successful down the road and in tournament play, we’re going to need everybody.”Roberson started in McCullough’s place and, aside from demanding little-to-no attention outside of the paint on offense, collected 10 rebounds and just two fouls, allowing him to play 44 of the game’s 45 minutes.Boeheim was critical of Roberson after the game and also disappointed with sophomore B.J. Johnson, who he hoped would come in and play adequate defense while spacing the floor as a perimeter threat. But Johnson was on the court for just three minutes, rushing a contested jump shot on his first possession and moving a step behind in the zone.“(Johnson)’s got to play defense. If he doesn’t score, I don’t care,” Boeheim said. “We need him to be more productive obviously, but we’ll see how that goes.”Aside from Johnson’s short stint in place of Gbinije, Boeheim played forwards Gbinije, Roberson and Rakeem Christmas for 131 of a possible 135 minutes. Additionally, Gbinije, Christmas and Trevor Cooney scored 73 of the Orange’s 86 points and SU needed overtime to barely edge a .500 Wake Forest team.Until Roberson or Johnson, or both, find a way to contribute offensively, McCullough’s injury will water down Syracuse’s offense while tightening an already thin rotation.Clemson is a slightly tougher opponent that beat then-No. 18 Arkansas on Dec. 7 and has already beaten Pittsburgh and lost to then-No. 19 North Carolina, then-No. 5 Louisville and then-No. 2 Virginia in its ACC schedule.The Tigers are paced offensively by forward Jaron Blossomgame — who averages 13.7 points and 8.3 rebounds per game — and have the conference’s seventh-best defense allowing 62.4 points per contest.Clemson isn’t exactly tailor-made to expose the Orange’s new holes, but it is a game that will expedite a process that Syracuse can’t dwell on for too long.McCullough isn’t coming back, not this year at least, and SU can’t afford to lose any conference game it can feasibly win.“It’s just one of those things that happens in sports,” Boeheim said. “Ohio State won the national championship and they lost two guys. You just have to play, it’s unfortunate.” Comments Published on January 16, 2015 at 2:14 pm Contact Jesse: jcdoug01@syr.edu | @dougherty_jesselast_img read more

Gould school offers new homeless advocacy class

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first_imgIn addition to work in the field, students will share their experiences at different firms once a week during class. Riley said he believes this reflective portion of the class is crucial for each student’s individual development. Riley said the legal externship will cover other special topics in the future depending on student interest. Currently, students have expressed interest in entertainment law.  Gilliam also hopes students will begin to consider service gaps in the legal system and how lawyers can improve advocacy for the homeless.  Students have been placed at local public interest law firms including Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority and the L.A. County Public Defender’s office, where they will work with clients to hone their legal writing, oral advocacy and client interviewing skills.  “I’m excited to have the students take a macro look at the system and make potential suggestions for improvements by the end of the semester,” Gilliam said.  Trojan Shelter Director of Media Matthew Lee supports the new class and its goal to help underserved groups.  “What I recognized really quickly [at LAHSA] is that we didn’t have enough lawyers available to clients,” Gilliam said. “Even more concerning is that it doesn’t look like there’s even enough lawyers in the pipeline for the need.”  According to an L.A. County report, the number of people experiencing homelessness increased 12% over the last year, totaling 59,000 people countywide. Riley believes the firsthand experience working with homeless clients will be impactful for participating students.  “Some students are directly working with people experiencing homelessness, some are more tangentially working with that issue,” Riley said. “So it’ll be interesting, I think, for them to have that reflection learning process.” “The course is designed to first kind of give them a kind of real-world exposure to the homelessness epidemic that we have in Los Angeles and across our country,” said James Gilliam, a Gould lecturer who is teaching the course.  Gilliam designed the class as an opportunity for students to witness the legal obstacles people experiencing homelessness face in securing housing and to understand how lawyers can tackle those barriers. These obstacles include outstanding debt and prior convictions, which can be expunged with legal assistance. center_img Gilliam worked with Brenda Wiewel, director of the USC Initiative to Eliminate Homelessness, and Laura Riley, Gould director of experiential learning, to design the externship program.  “When we look at underrepresented communities, one of the biggest things that really doesn’t help them is that they don’t actually have a lot of experience or knowledge in the field of law,” Lee said. “They’re underrepresented, and they don’t have the allies or the knowledge or the legal agency that they need in order to get out of these bad situations.” Gilliam, who is also an attorney and coordinator at LAHSA, said his work with homelessness prevention inspired him to create the class. He hopes the experience will motivate students to pursue public interest law in the future.  “I thought students might be interested in looking at this as a lens by which to experience their externship more impactfully, being able to look at policy issues, getting to look at the individual effects of homelessness and seeing how our city is sort of uniquely addressing the issue and what still needs to be done,” Riley said.  The one-unit legal externship class will be offered at the Gould School of Law. (Vincent Leo | Daily Trojan) “I really want them to do a full — what I call legal services — analysis of the family,” Gilliam said. “The goal is to prevent paying any money they  don’t need to pay or shouldn’t be paying and to maximize the income that’s coming into the family.”  The Gould School of Law is offering a new one-unit legal externship class that allows students to work with nonprofits that advocate on behalf of the homeless population. Students will also develop policy analysis skills of current legislation that may further stymie homelessness. “There are a number of changes to state and local law that would make either drivers of homelessness reduced or establishing rights for people experiencing homelessness,” Gilliam said. last_img read more

USC football is overcoming a difficult season by finding their identity

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first_imgIdentity is everything in the FBS, but not for the USC Trojans.In a season characterized by constant personnel loss and offensive restructuring, the Trojans (4-3) have an opportunity to advance in the Pac-12 South with a victory over the Cal Bears (4-3) tonight at the Coliseum.The Trojans are dealing with already having lost redshirt junior defensive tackle Kenny Bigelow, redshirt junior wide receiver Steven Mitchell Jr and Osa Masina.And while the Cal and USC men’s water polo teams have better chances to capture NCAA titles than do the football teams, a win on Thursday night could be the difference between rebuilding and restarting.“Any time you go seven games straight, you’re going to get some bumps and bruises,” head coach Clay Helton told the media after practice on Sunday. “They’re fresh. They’re bouncing with energy and great juice. That comes from being one game out of first place in the south. It’s an exciting time right now, and I’m looking forward to it.”Prior to their 52-6 drubbing at the hands of the Alabama Crimson Tide, the Trojans were identified as the 20th-best team in the nation. They were identified as the same run-and-shoot USC team that would bring in an experienced pocket passer and utilize their potential Heisman candidate running back to supply the fire for a defense that relied on its linemen up front.But, as much as tonight’s game is about rebuilding and restarting, it’s also about redefining, and four games ago, USC started its transformation.No longer is the prototypical pocket-passing quarterback Max Browne the starter. No longer is Ronald Jones II the bona fide Heisman candidate we thought he was, and no longer does USC’s passing defense struggle to contain opposing quarterbacks.The reason USC holds a 4-3 record in 2016 after an embarrassing loss on national television is because they allowed their own future plans to define them, not their past experiences or their opponents’ expectations.After losing three of their first four, redshirt freshman starting quarterback Sam Darnold has averaged 315 yards and 3.6 touchdowns on a 68-of-102 passing with 84 yards and a touchdown on the ground in his past three games.“The way [Browne] competed and performed was more than honorable, but the realism of football is when you’re 1-2 and you’ve scored one touchdown against Alabama and Stanford,” Helton said. “I want to see a spark in our offense, and I hope that Sam can bring that. I’m confident in it after watching three games of watching him perform, seeing him in the arena and seeing what he can do.”Instead of USC running just Jones, the Men of Troy have rushed for 175.5 yards per game thanks to a mix of Jones, senior Justin Davis, sophomores Aca’Cedric Ware and Dominic Davis.On defense, the Trojans have held their past three opponents to an average of 17 points per game and 52.4 percent completion through the air thanks to nine sacks, four interceptions and two fumble recoveries.Though Troy’s 2016 season is characterized with breaking expectations, there are certain facets of their identity that remain paramount to success.For example, the expectation of another top-10 season for junior wide receiver JuJu Smith-Schuster is just starting to come to fruition — thanks to Darnold, however.Before Darnold, Smith-Schuster caught just 11 passes for 99 yards and two touchdowns. During Darnold’s tenure, Smith-Schuster has 29 receptions for 466 yards and six touchdowns.“Whenever I have the chance to get it out to him, I know he’s going to do something special with it,” Darnold said.Along with Smith-Schuster’s success, USC’s 11-game winning streak over Cal should remain an expectation that Helton’s squad hopes to maintain.Against Cal, a team that USC has defeated every season since 2003, the Trojans have the potential to start their ascension towards a Pac-12 title.Other than winning nearly 70 percent of their Thursday games, the Men of Troy hold an all-time 67-30-5 record versus the Golden Bears and a 56-17-1 line in games immediately following their bye week since 1995.No strangers to shattered expectations themselves, Cal’s head coach Sonny Dykes’ squad was projected to be an afterthought in the Pac-12. Instead, they’ve become the only team in the conference to down top-dog Utah, two top-25 teams and rank among the best in the nation for their exceptional passing offense.“Every time you play a team that scores 43 points, you better be scoring some points of your own. In this game, I don’t think field goals will be good enough,” Helton said. “We’ve really preached about being pros. They really want to be a good football team, and in order to do that, you need to put in the extra time.”Thanks to the efforts of Texas Tech-transfer senior quarterback Davis Webb (2,581 passing yards and 27 touchdowns) and senior running back Khalfani Muhammad (525 rushing yards and two touchdowns), Cal has averaged 43.7 offensive points per game this year.The only expected downside of Cal’s team has been their defense which ranks in the bottom 10 in total yards and points allowed.That considered, the Bears’ offense has managed to keep things close despite playing some of the Pac-12’s best.Excluding their 51-31 romp over Hawaii in week one, Cal has either won or lost by an average of 5.5 points. With such a slim margin of victory and defeat, the Trojans have to be careful toward the end of the game when every possession matters.Overall, this game will be about confirming or shattering expectations for both teams. If Cal pulls out a victory, it would be the first road victory against USC in over 15 seasons, while a USC victory would signal a complete fortune reversal from their abysmal 1-3 start and a potential route to a Pac-12 South title.One thing that will be for certain: Cal wants this game badly.“I don’t remember the score, but I remember the whipping we got my freshman year. Ever since then, the goal was to make sure we beat the crap out of them or die trying,” said Cal senior left guard Chris Borrayo to the San Francisco Chronicle. “It was a pretty nasty game my freshman year, and I don’t know if you guys understand this about USC: Class is not in their name. It’s something important to me and something very important to our team to know we’re going out there trying to win. I want to beat the crap out of USC.”last_img read more